Is there an association between the home food environment, the local food shopping environment and children's fruit and vegetable intake? Results from the Dutch INPACT study

Wilke J. C. van Ansem*, Carola T. M. Schrijvers, Gerda Rodenburg, Dike van de Mheen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: 

To examine: (i) the association between home availability of fruit and vegetables and children's fruit and vegetable intake; (ii) the association between parental perception of the local food shopping environment and the home availability of fruit and vegetables; and (iii) whether the home availability of fruit and vegetables mediates the association between parental perception of the local food environment and children's fruit and vegetable consumption.

Design: 

Cross-sectional study.

Setting: 

A total of ninety-one primary schools in the Netherlands.

Subjects: 

In total 1501 primary caregivers completed a questionnaire to measure children's fruit and vegetable consumption, home availability of fruit and vegetables, parental perceptions of the local food shopping environment (price, quality and availability), the child's socio-economic status, the child's ethnicity and maternal height and weight.

Results: 

The home availability of fruit and vegetables was positively associated with children's fruit and vegetable intake (P <0.01 and P <0.001, respectively). Negative parental perceptions of the local food shopping environment were associated with less fruit available at home (P <0.05, P <0.01 and P <0.05 for price, quality and availability of fruit, respectively). No significant associations were found between parental perception of the local food shopping environment and children's fruit and vegetable consumption. We found no evidence that home availability of fruit and vegetables mediates the association between parental perception of the local food environment and children's fruit and vegetable intake.

Conclusions: 

Interventions focusing on improving the home availability of fruit and vegetables may help to increase children's fruit and vegetable consumption. However, more data are required on factors influencing the home availability of fruit and vegetables.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1206-1214
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
Volume16
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Home food environment
  • Food shopping environment
  • Fruit and vegetable intake
  • Children
  • PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
  • CONSUMPTION
  • DETERMINANTS
  • ADOLESCENTS
  • FAMILY
  • REPRODUCIBILITY
  • QUESTIONNAIRE
  • PERCEPTIONS
  • OVERWEIGHT
  • BEHAVIORS

Cite this