Islamic religious education in the Netherlands

W. Shadid, P.S. van Koningsveld

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    Abstract

    In Dutch primary schools, students choose from among several options for their religious education. In addition to the compulsory “spiritual movements” course, students can either study Islamic religious education (offered in 7 percent of public schools) or Christian religious education. The public and political debates surrounding the 41 Islamic primary schools has shifted over time. Whereas earlier on the debate focused around the merits of, or prejudices against these types of schools, more recent debates have looked at how these schools may impact the integration of Islam students into Dutch society. Most recently, management and quality issues plaguing these schools has been the focus of debate.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)76-88
    Number of pages13
    JournalEuropean education
    Volume38
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - 2006

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    religious education
    Netherlands
    school
    primary school
    student
    prejudice
    Islam
    management

    Cite this

    Shadid, W., & van Koningsveld, P. S. (2006). Islamic religious education in the Netherlands. European education, 38(2), 76-88.
    Shadid, W. ; van Koningsveld, P.S. / Islamic religious education in the Netherlands. In: European education. 2006 ; Vol. 38, No. 2. pp. 76-88.
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    Shadid, W & van Koningsveld, PS 2006, 'Islamic religious education in the Netherlands', European education, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 76-88.

    Islamic religious education in the Netherlands. / Shadid, W.; van Koningsveld, P.S.

    In: European education, Vol. 38, No. 2, 2006, p. 76-88.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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    Shadid W, van Koningsveld PS. Islamic religious education in the Netherlands. European education. 2006;38(2):76-88.