Job satisfaction and family hapiness

The part-time work puzzle

A.L. Booth, J.C. van Ours

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

We investigate the relationship between part‐time work and working hours satisfaction, job satisfaction and life satisfaction. We account for interdependence within the family using data on partnered men and women from the British Household Panel Survey. Men have the highest hours‐of‐work satisfaction if they work full‐time without overtime hours but neither their job satisfaction nor their life satisfaction are affected by how many hours they work. Women present a puzzle. Hours satisfaction and job satisfaction indicate that women prefer part‐time jobs irrespective of whether these are small or large but their life satisfaction is virtually unaffected by hours of work.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)F77-F99
JournalEconomic Journal
Volume118
Issue number526
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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Job satisfaction
Life satisfaction
Work hours
Interdependence
British Household Panel Survey
Hours of work
Overtime
Working hours

Cite this

Booth, A. L., & van Ours, J. C. (2008). Job satisfaction and family hapiness: The part-time work puzzle. Economic Journal, 118(526), F77-F99.
Booth, A.L. ; van Ours, J.C. / Job satisfaction and family hapiness : The part-time work puzzle. In: Economic Journal. 2008 ; Vol. 118, No. 526. pp. F77-F99.
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Booth, AL & van Ours, JC 2008, 'Job satisfaction and family hapiness: The part-time work puzzle', Economic Journal, vol. 118, no. 526, pp. F77-F99.

Job satisfaction and family hapiness : The part-time work puzzle. / Booth, A.L.; van Ours, J.C.

In: Economic Journal, Vol. 118, No. 526, 2008, p. F77-F99.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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AB - We investigate the relationship between part‐time work and working hours satisfaction, job satisfaction and life satisfaction. We account for interdependence within the family using data on partnered men and women from the British Household Panel Survey. Men have the highest hours‐of‐work satisfaction if they work full‐time without overtime hours but neither their job satisfaction nor their life satisfaction are affected by how many hours they work. Women present a puzzle. Hours satisfaction and job satisfaction indicate that women prefer part‐time jobs irrespective of whether these are small or large but their life satisfaction is virtually unaffected by hours of work.

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SP - F77-F99

JO - The Economic Journal

JF - The Economic Journal

SN - 0013-0133

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