Justice concerns can feed nationalistic concerns and impede solidarity in the euro crisis: How victim sensitivity translates into political attitudes

T. Rothmund, O. Stavrova, T. Schlösser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated how victim sensitivity and news media exposure conjointly contribute to the formation of political attitudes in the context of the euro crisis. Study 1 (N = 208) showed that observer-sensitive individuals were more likely and victim-sensitive individuals were less likely to support solidarity with countries in need of financial support. These correlations were mediated by affective components of political attitudes, namely nationalistic concerns, resentment about and empathic concerns with debtor countries. In Study 2 (N = 51), using a pre–post within-subjects design, we showed that framing the euro crisis in an ‘exploitation frame” (compared to a ‘solidarity frame’) in news media reports was more likely to trigger nationalistic concerns and, consequently, decrease support of solidarity in victim-sensitive individuals compared to their less victim-sensitive counterparts. These results are in line with the SeMI model and previous findings that victim sensitivity is linked to fear of being exploited in intergroup relations.
Keywords
Justice sensitivity Framing Emotions Attitudes SeMI model Political communication
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)48-71
JournalSocial Justice Research
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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