Latent profiles of early trauma & Type D personality

Sex differences in cardiovascular risk markers

E.M.J. van Montfort, P.M.C. Mommersteeg, V.R.M. Spek, N. Kupper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Background: 

Both adverse early life-events and distressed personality are associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. As there is an important link between these psychological factors, we investigated how these might cluster in sex-specific psychological profiles. We further examined the association of these profiles with cardiovascular risk markers.

Method: 

446 women (mean age = 49.8 +/- 17.9 years) and 431 men (mean age = 49.4 +/- 17.5 years) from the Dutch general population completed questionnaires on demographics, adverse early life-events (ETI), Type D personality (DS14), anxiety (GAD-7) and depressive (PHQ-9) symptoms, and traditional cardiovascular risk markers.

Results: 

A step-3 latent profile analysis identified three profiles in women (Reference, Type D & trauma, and Type D/no trauma) and four in men (Reference, Type D & trauma, Type D/no trauma, and Physical abuse). In women, the Type D/no trauma was associated with highest levels of emotional symptoms (OR = 2.47; 95% CI: 2.11-2.89), lipid abnormalities (OR = 3.69; 95% CI: 1.47-9.27), and increased levels of alcohol use (OR = 3.63; 95% CI: 1.42-930). The Type D & trauma profile was associated with increased levels of emotional symptoms (OR = 2.03; 95% CI: 1.70-2.42), highest levels of smoking (OR = 3.30; 95% CI: 1.21-8.97) and alcohol use (OR = 7.63; 95% CI: 2.86-20.33). Women in both profiles were older as compared to the Reference group (OR = 1.03; 95% CI: 1.01-1.05). In men, the Type D & trauma profile was associated with increased levels of emotional symptoms (OR = 1.11; 95% CI: 1.03-1.20). There were no significant differences between the profiles in lifestyle factors and cardiometabolic factors.

Conclusions: 

In women, the Type D/no trauma profile and the Type D & trauma profile were associated with a specific combination of cardiovascular risk markers. In men, the Type D & trauma profile was associated with an increased level of emotional symptoms. 

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)38-45
JournalComprehensive Psychiatry
Volume83
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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Wounds and Injuries
Alcohols
Lipids

Keywords

  • Personality
  • Type D
  • trauma, personality, coping self-efficacy
  • cardiovascular risk factors
  • Cholesterol
  • Hypertension
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Lifestyle

Cite this

@article{7440ec8b0c01487d97a85a3b31fd27d9,
title = "Latent profiles of early trauma & Type D personality: Sex differences in cardiovascular risk markers",
abstract = "Background: Both adverse early life-events and distressed personality are associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. As there is an important link between these psychological factors, we investigated how these might cluster in sex-specific psychological profiles. We further examined the association of these profiles with cardiovascular risk markers.Method: 446 women (mean age = 49.8 +/- 17.9 years) and 431 men (mean age = 49.4 +/- 17.5 years) from the Dutch general population completed questionnaires on demographics, adverse early life-events (ETI), Type D personality (DS14), anxiety (GAD-7) and depressive (PHQ-9) symptoms, and traditional cardiovascular risk markers.Results: A step-3 latent profile analysis identified three profiles in women (Reference, Type D & trauma, and Type D/no trauma) and four in men (Reference, Type D & trauma, Type D/no trauma, and Physical abuse). In women, the Type D/no trauma was associated with highest levels of emotional symptoms (OR = 2.47; 95{\%} CI: 2.11-2.89), lipid abnormalities (OR = 3.69; 95{\%} CI: 1.47-9.27), and increased levels of alcohol use (OR = 3.63; 95{\%} CI: 1.42-930). The Type D & trauma profile was associated with increased levels of emotional symptoms (OR = 2.03; 95{\%} CI: 1.70-2.42), highest levels of smoking (OR = 3.30; 95{\%} CI: 1.21-8.97) and alcohol use (OR = 7.63; 95{\%} CI: 2.86-20.33). Women in both profiles were older as compared to the Reference group (OR = 1.03; 95{\%} CI: 1.01-1.05). In men, the Type D & trauma profile was associated with increased levels of emotional symptoms (OR = 1.11; 95{\%} CI: 1.03-1.20). There were no significant differences between the profiles in lifestyle factors and cardiometabolic factors.Conclusions: In women, the Type D/no trauma profile and the Type D & trauma profile were associated with a specific combination of cardiovascular risk markers. In men, the Type D & trauma profile was associated with an increased level of emotional symptoms. ",
keywords = "Personality, Type D, trauma, personality, coping self-efficacy, cardiovascular risk factors, Cholesterol, Hypertension, Anxiety, Depression, Lifestyle",
author = "{van Montfort}, E.M.J. and P.M.C. Mommersteeg and V.R.M. Spek and N. Kupper",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1016/j.comppsych.2018.02.009",
language = "English",
volume = "83",
pages = "38--45",
journal = "Comprehensive Psychiatry",
issn = "0010-440X",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",

}

Latent profiles of early trauma & Type D personality : Sex differences in cardiovascular risk markers. / van Montfort, E.M.J.; Mommersteeg, P.M.C.; Spek, V.R.M.; Kupper, N.

In: Comprehensive Psychiatry, Vol. 83, 2018, p. 38-45.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Latent profiles of early trauma & Type D personality

T2 - Sex differences in cardiovascular risk markers

AU - van Montfort, E.M.J.

AU - Mommersteeg, P.M.C.

AU - Spek, V.R.M.

AU - Kupper, N.

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Background: Both adverse early life-events and distressed personality are associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. As there is an important link between these psychological factors, we investigated how these might cluster in sex-specific psychological profiles. We further examined the association of these profiles with cardiovascular risk markers.Method: 446 women (mean age = 49.8 +/- 17.9 years) and 431 men (mean age = 49.4 +/- 17.5 years) from the Dutch general population completed questionnaires on demographics, adverse early life-events (ETI), Type D personality (DS14), anxiety (GAD-7) and depressive (PHQ-9) symptoms, and traditional cardiovascular risk markers.Results: A step-3 latent profile analysis identified three profiles in women (Reference, Type D & trauma, and Type D/no trauma) and four in men (Reference, Type D & trauma, Type D/no trauma, and Physical abuse). In women, the Type D/no trauma was associated with highest levels of emotional symptoms (OR = 2.47; 95% CI: 2.11-2.89), lipid abnormalities (OR = 3.69; 95% CI: 1.47-9.27), and increased levels of alcohol use (OR = 3.63; 95% CI: 1.42-930). The Type D & trauma profile was associated with increased levels of emotional symptoms (OR = 2.03; 95% CI: 1.70-2.42), highest levels of smoking (OR = 3.30; 95% CI: 1.21-8.97) and alcohol use (OR = 7.63; 95% CI: 2.86-20.33). Women in both profiles were older as compared to the Reference group (OR = 1.03; 95% CI: 1.01-1.05). In men, the Type D & trauma profile was associated with increased levels of emotional symptoms (OR = 1.11; 95% CI: 1.03-1.20). There were no significant differences between the profiles in lifestyle factors and cardiometabolic factors.Conclusions: In women, the Type D/no trauma profile and the Type D & trauma profile were associated with a specific combination of cardiovascular risk markers. In men, the Type D & trauma profile was associated with an increased level of emotional symptoms. 

AB - Background: Both adverse early life-events and distressed personality are associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. As there is an important link between these psychological factors, we investigated how these might cluster in sex-specific psychological profiles. We further examined the association of these profiles with cardiovascular risk markers.Method: 446 women (mean age = 49.8 +/- 17.9 years) and 431 men (mean age = 49.4 +/- 17.5 years) from the Dutch general population completed questionnaires on demographics, adverse early life-events (ETI), Type D personality (DS14), anxiety (GAD-7) and depressive (PHQ-9) symptoms, and traditional cardiovascular risk markers.Results: A step-3 latent profile analysis identified three profiles in women (Reference, Type D & trauma, and Type D/no trauma) and four in men (Reference, Type D & trauma, Type D/no trauma, and Physical abuse). In women, the Type D/no trauma was associated with highest levels of emotional symptoms (OR = 2.47; 95% CI: 2.11-2.89), lipid abnormalities (OR = 3.69; 95% CI: 1.47-9.27), and increased levels of alcohol use (OR = 3.63; 95% CI: 1.42-930). The Type D & trauma profile was associated with increased levels of emotional symptoms (OR = 2.03; 95% CI: 1.70-2.42), highest levels of smoking (OR = 3.30; 95% CI: 1.21-8.97) and alcohol use (OR = 7.63; 95% CI: 2.86-20.33). Women in both profiles were older as compared to the Reference group (OR = 1.03; 95% CI: 1.01-1.05). In men, the Type D & trauma profile was associated with increased levels of emotional symptoms (OR = 1.11; 95% CI: 1.03-1.20). There were no significant differences between the profiles in lifestyle factors and cardiometabolic factors.Conclusions: In women, the Type D/no trauma profile and the Type D & trauma profile were associated with a specific combination of cardiovascular risk markers. In men, the Type D & trauma profile was associated with an increased level of emotional symptoms. 

KW - Personality

KW - Type D

KW - trauma, personality, coping self-efficacy

KW - cardiovascular risk factors

KW - Cholesterol

KW - Hypertension

KW - Anxiety

KW - Depression

KW - Lifestyle

U2 - 10.1016/j.comppsych.2018.02.009

DO - 10.1016/j.comppsych.2018.02.009

M3 - Article

VL - 83

SP - 38

EP - 45

JO - Comprehensive Psychiatry

JF - Comprehensive Psychiatry

SN - 0010-440X

ER -