Learning How To Throw Darts: The Effect Of Modeling Type And Reflection On Dart-Throwing Skills

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

Abstract

In this study we investigate the effect of modeling type and reflection on the acquisition of dart-throwing skills, self-efficacy beliefs and self-reaction scores by replicating a study by Kitsantas, Zimmerman, and Cleary (2000). Participants observing a coping model were expected to surpass participants observing a mastery model who in turn were expected to outperform participants who learned without a model. Reflection was hypothesized to have a positive effect. Ninety undergraduate students were tested three times on dart-throwing skills, self-efficacy beliefs, and self-reaction scores. Contrary to what was expected, we found no main effects of modeling type and reflection. No interaction effects were found either. There was an effect of trial, indicating that participants improved dart-throwing skills, self-efficacy beliefs, and self-reaction scores over time. Furthermore, self-efficacy beliefs and dart-throwing skill were highly correlated. Our results suggest that learners do not benefit from observing a model and reflecting, but practice makes perfect.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 38th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society
Place of PublicationAustin, TX
PublisherThe Cognitive Science Society
Pages99-104
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9780991196739
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Cite this

van der Loo, J., Frissen, E., & Krahmer, E. (2016). Learning How To Throw Darts: The Effect Of Modeling Type And Reflection On Dart-Throwing Skills. In Proceedings of the 38th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 99-104). Austin, TX: The Cognitive Science Society.
van der Loo, Janneke ; Frissen, Eefje ; Krahmer, Emiel. / Learning How To Throw Darts : The Effect Of Modeling Type And Reflection On Dart-Throwing Skills. Proceedings of the 38th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Austin, TX : The Cognitive Science Society, 2016. pp. 99-104
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abstract = "In this study we investigate the effect of modeling type and reflection on the acquisition of dart-throwing skills, self-efficacy beliefs and self-reaction scores by replicating a study by Kitsantas, Zimmerman, and Cleary (2000). Participants observing a coping model were expected to surpass participants observing a mastery model who in turn were expected to outperform participants who learned without a model. Reflection was hypothesized to have a positive effect. Ninety undergraduate students were tested three times on dart-throwing skills, self-efficacy beliefs, and self-reaction scores. Contrary to what was expected, we found no main effects of modeling type and reflection. No interaction effects were found either. There was an effect of trial, indicating that participants improved dart-throwing skills, self-efficacy beliefs, and self-reaction scores over time. Furthermore, self-efficacy beliefs and dart-throwing skill were highly correlated. Our results suggest that learners do not benefit from observing a model and reflecting, but practice makes perfect.",
author = "{van der Loo}, Janneke and Eefje Frissen and Emiel Krahmer",
year = "2016",
language = "English",
pages = "99--104",
booktitle = "Proceedings of the 38th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society",
publisher = "The Cognitive Science Society",

}

van der Loo, J, Frissen, E & Krahmer, E 2016, Learning How To Throw Darts: The Effect Of Modeling Type And Reflection On Dart-Throwing Skills. in Proceedings of the 38th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. The Cognitive Science Society, Austin, TX, pp. 99-104.

Learning How To Throw Darts : The Effect Of Modeling Type And Reflection On Dart-Throwing Skills. / van der Loo, Janneke; Frissen, Eefje; Krahmer, Emiel.

Proceedings of the 38th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Austin, TX : The Cognitive Science Society, 2016. p. 99-104.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

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AB - In this study we investigate the effect of modeling type and reflection on the acquisition of dart-throwing skills, self-efficacy beliefs and self-reaction scores by replicating a study by Kitsantas, Zimmerman, and Cleary (2000). Participants observing a coping model were expected to surpass participants observing a mastery model who in turn were expected to outperform participants who learned without a model. Reflection was hypothesized to have a positive effect. Ninety undergraduate students were tested three times on dart-throwing skills, self-efficacy beliefs, and self-reaction scores. Contrary to what was expected, we found no main effects of modeling type and reflection. No interaction effects were found either. There was an effect of trial, indicating that participants improved dart-throwing skills, self-efficacy beliefs, and self-reaction scores over time. Furthermore, self-efficacy beliefs and dart-throwing skill were highly correlated. Our results suggest that learners do not benefit from observing a model and reflecting, but practice makes perfect.

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van der Loo J, Frissen E, Krahmer E. Learning How To Throw Darts: The Effect Of Modeling Type And Reflection On Dart-Throwing Skills. In Proceedings of the 38th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Austin, TX: The Cognitive Science Society. 2016. p. 99-104