Local Economic Trading Schemes and their implications for marketing assumptions, concepts, and practices

D. Crowther, A-M. Greene, D.M. Hosking

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

This paper focuses on the relationship between a particular social practice - local exchange trading systems or schemes (LETS) - and what we here call the "mainstream" marketing paradigm. It begins by discussing some of the key principles that are thought to set LETS apart from other, "more mainstream", economic activities. One case is then given particular attention - the "Ithaca hours" system - run in Ithaca, New York. Having examined the formalities of the system and its operation, the paper reviews what participants say about their participation. The paper draws upon these multiple narratives to explore the ways LETS may be both similar to and different from other forms of economic and social praxis. The authors' argument is that "mainstream" marketing concepts and practices fail to embrace all the complexities of LETS as social-economic practices.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)354-362
JournalManagement Decision
Volume40
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Economics
Trading systems
Marketing
Participation
Praxis
Marketing practices
Paradigm
Social practice
Economic activity
Marketing concept
Mainstream economics

Cite this

Crowther, D. ; Greene, A-M. ; Hosking, D.M. / Local Economic Trading Schemes and their implications for marketing assumptions, concepts, and practices. In: Management Decision. 2002 ; Vol. 40, No. 4. pp. 354-362.
@article{8471dcfafa574d17b56c9ae116345ae7,
title = "Local Economic Trading Schemes and their implications for marketing assumptions, concepts, and practices",
abstract = "This paper focuses on the relationship between a particular social practice - local exchange trading systems or schemes (LETS) - and what we here call the {"}mainstream{"} marketing paradigm. It begins by discussing some of the key principles that are thought to set LETS apart from other, {"}more mainstream{"}, economic activities. One case is then given particular attention - the {"}Ithaca hours{"} system - run in Ithaca, New York. Having examined the formalities of the system and its operation, the paper reviews what participants say about their participation. The paper draws upon these multiple narratives to explore the ways LETS may be both similar to and different from other forms of economic and social praxis. The authors' argument is that {"}mainstream{"} marketing concepts and practices fail to embrace all the complexities of LETS as social-economic practices.",
author = "D. Crowther and A-M. Greene and D.M. Hosking",
year = "2002",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "354--362",
journal = "Management Decision",
issn = "0025-1747",
publisher = "Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.",
number = "4",

}

Local Economic Trading Schemes and their implications for marketing assumptions, concepts, and practices. / Crowther, D.; Greene, A-M.; Hosking, D.M.

In: Management Decision, Vol. 40, No. 4, 2002, p. 354-362.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Local Economic Trading Schemes and their implications for marketing assumptions, concepts, and practices

AU - Crowther, D.

AU - Greene, A-M.

AU - Hosking, D.M.

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - This paper focuses on the relationship between a particular social practice - local exchange trading systems or schemes (LETS) - and what we here call the "mainstream" marketing paradigm. It begins by discussing some of the key principles that are thought to set LETS apart from other, "more mainstream", economic activities. One case is then given particular attention - the "Ithaca hours" system - run in Ithaca, New York. Having examined the formalities of the system and its operation, the paper reviews what participants say about their participation. The paper draws upon these multiple narratives to explore the ways LETS may be both similar to and different from other forms of economic and social praxis. The authors' argument is that "mainstream" marketing concepts and practices fail to embrace all the complexities of LETS as social-economic practices.

AB - This paper focuses on the relationship between a particular social practice - local exchange trading systems or schemes (LETS) - and what we here call the "mainstream" marketing paradigm. It begins by discussing some of the key principles that are thought to set LETS apart from other, "more mainstream", economic activities. One case is then given particular attention - the "Ithaca hours" system - run in Ithaca, New York. Having examined the formalities of the system and its operation, the paper reviews what participants say about their participation. The paper draws upon these multiple narratives to explore the ways LETS may be both similar to and different from other forms of economic and social praxis. The authors' argument is that "mainstream" marketing concepts and practices fail to embrace all the complexities of LETS as social-economic practices.

M3 - Article

VL - 40

SP - 354

EP - 362

JO - Management Decision

JF - Management Decision

SN - 0025-1747

IS - 4

ER -