Loneliness in adolescence

Eeske van Roekel, Ron H. J. Scholte, Maaike Verhagen, Luc Goossens, Rutger C. M. E. Engels

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Background:

Loneliness is assumed to peak in early adolescence and to decrease throughout middle and late adolescence, but longitudinal confirmation of this tendency is lacking. Behavioral genetic studies with twin designs have found a significant genetic component for loneliness in children and adults, but no molecular genetic studies have been conducted to reveal the functional polymorphisms involved.

Methods:

Associations among the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR), sex, parental support, and loneliness were examined in a longitudinal study spanning five annual waves (N = 306).

Results:

Using latent growth curve modeling (LGCM), loneliness was found to be highest in early adolescence and slowly declined throughout adolescence. The 5-HTTLPR genotype was related to the development of loneliness, in that short allele carriers remained stable in loneliness over time, whereas adolescents with the long-long genotype decreased in loneliness. Interactions were found between maternal support and 5-HTTLPR genotype, showing that adolescents who perceived little support from their mothers and carried a short allele were at increased risk for developing loneliness.

Conclusions:

Our study is the first to chart adolescent loneliness longitudinally and to examine the genetic underpinnings of loneliness. Our results contribute to a further understanding of the environmental and genetic basis of loneliness. Replication of our results is needed in both population-based and clinical samples.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)747-754
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
Volume51
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Loneliness
Alleles
Mothers
Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins
Twin Studies

Keywords

  • Loneliness
  • serotonin transporter
  • 5-HTTLPR
  • parental support
  • gene-environment interaction
  • adolescence
  • LIFE EVENTS
  • DEPRESSION
  • POLYMORPHISM
  • ASSOCIATION
  • DISORDERS
  • GENOTYPE
  • CHILDREN
  • SLC6A4

Cite this

van Roekel, E., Scholte, R. H. J., Verhagen, M., Goossens, L., & Engels, R. C. M. E. (2010). Loneliness in adolescence. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 51(7), 747-754. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7610.2010.02225.x
van Roekel, Eeske ; Scholte, Ron H. J. ; Verhagen, Maaike ; Goossens, Luc ; Engels, Rutger C. M. E. / Loneliness in adolescence. In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry. 2010 ; Vol. 51, No. 7. pp. 747-754.
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van Roekel, E, Scholte, RHJ, Verhagen, M, Goossens, L & Engels, RCME 2010, 'Loneliness in adolescence', Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, vol. 51, no. 7, pp. 747-754. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7610.2010.02225.x

Loneliness in adolescence. / van Roekel, Eeske; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Verhagen, Maaike; Goossens, Luc; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Vol. 51, No. 7, 07.2010, p. 747-754.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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T1 - Loneliness in adolescence

AU - van Roekel, Eeske

AU - Scholte, Ron H. J.

AU - Verhagen, Maaike

AU - Goossens, Luc

AU - Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

PY - 2010/7

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N2 - Background:Loneliness is assumed to peak in early adolescence and to decrease throughout middle and late adolescence, but longitudinal confirmation of this tendency is lacking. Behavioral genetic studies with twin designs have found a significant genetic component for loneliness in children and adults, but no molecular genetic studies have been conducted to reveal the functional polymorphisms involved.Methods:Associations among the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR), sex, parental support, and loneliness were examined in a longitudinal study spanning five annual waves (N = 306).Results:Using latent growth curve modeling (LGCM), loneliness was found to be highest in early adolescence and slowly declined throughout adolescence. The 5-HTTLPR genotype was related to the development of loneliness, in that short allele carriers remained stable in loneliness over time, whereas adolescents with the long-long genotype decreased in loneliness. Interactions were found between maternal support and 5-HTTLPR genotype, showing that adolescents who perceived little support from their mothers and carried a short allele were at increased risk for developing loneliness.Conclusions:Our study is the first to chart adolescent loneliness longitudinally and to examine the genetic underpinnings of loneliness. Our results contribute to a further understanding of the environmental and genetic basis of loneliness. Replication of our results is needed in both population-based and clinical samples.

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KW - DISORDERS

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KW - CHILDREN

KW - SLC6A4

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DO - 10.1111/j.1469-7610.2010.02225.x

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