Long-term outcomes following vocational rehabilitation treatments in patients with prolonged fatigue

M.C.W. Joosen, M.H.W. Frings-Dresen, J.K. Sluiter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Background
Multi-component vocational rehabilitation (VR) provides positive short-term outcomes in patients with prolonged fatigue.
Purpose
The purpose of this study is to evaluate the long-term outcomes of Dutch multi-component VR up to 18 months after treatment.
Method
In a pre–post-study, measurements were taken before treatment (t0), after treatment (t1) and in long-term follow-ups at 6 (t2), 12 (t3) and 18 months (t4) after treatment. Primary outcomes (fatigue, work participation and workability) and secondary outcomes [physical and social functioning, mental health and heart rate variability (HRV)] were assessed over time using linear mixed models analyses. Post hoc long-term outcomes were compared with t0 and t1.
Results
Sixty patients with severe fatigue complaints participated. The primary outcomes significantly (p < 0.001) improved at follow-ups compared with t0 and showed no relapse compared with t1. Moreover, fatigue decreased (p < 0.002) whereas workability (p < 0.001) and work participation (p < 0.001) increased further after treatment (t1). The secondary outcomes, physical functioning, mental health, social functioning and HRV, improved significantly (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.001 and p = 0.049, respectively) over the long term compared with t0. At 6-month follow-up (t2), mental health (p < 0.003) and social functioning (p = 0.003) further increased after the treatment was stopped.
Conclusion
Multi-component VR treatments seem to significantly and in a clinically relevant way decrease fatigue symptoms and improve individual functioning and work participation in patients with severe prolonged fatigue over the long term and without showing relapse.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)42-51
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Mental Health
Patient Participation
Linear Models

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@article{6cc0d2e132cc4d288002ddbfd017823a,
title = "Long-term outcomes following vocational rehabilitation treatments in patients with prolonged fatigue",
abstract = "BackgroundMulti-component vocational rehabilitation (VR) provides positive short-term outcomes in patients with prolonged fatigue.PurposeThe purpose of this study is to evaluate the long-term outcomes of Dutch multi-component VR up to 18 months after treatment.MethodIn a pre–post-study, measurements were taken before treatment (t0), after treatment (t1) and in long-term follow-ups at 6 (t2), 12 (t3) and 18 months (t4) after treatment. Primary outcomes (fatigue, work participation and workability) and secondary outcomes [physical and social functioning, mental health and heart rate variability (HRV)] were assessed over time using linear mixed models analyses. Post hoc long-term outcomes were compared with t0 and t1.ResultsSixty patients with severe fatigue complaints participated. The primary outcomes significantly (p < 0.001) improved at follow-ups compared with t0 and showed no relapse compared with t1. Moreover, fatigue decreased (p < 0.002) whereas workability (p < 0.001) and work participation (p < 0.001) increased further after treatment (t1). The secondary outcomes, physical functioning, mental health, social functioning and HRV, improved significantly (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.001 and p = 0.049, respectively) over the long term compared with t0. At 6-month follow-up (t2), mental health (p < 0.003) and social functioning (p = 0.003) further increased after the treatment was stopped.ConclusionMulti-component VR treatments seem to significantly and in a clinically relevant way decrease fatigue symptoms and improve individual functioning and work participation in patients with severe prolonged fatigue over the long term and without showing relapse.",
author = "M.C.W. Joosen and M.H.W. Frings-Dresen and J.K. Sluiter",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1007/s12529-011-9208-z",
language = "English",
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pages = "42--51",
journal = "International Journal of Behavioral Medicine",
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Long-term outcomes following vocational rehabilitation treatments in patients with prolonged fatigue. / Joosen, M.C.W.; Frings-Dresen, M.H.W.; Sluiter, J.K.

In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 20, No. 1, 2013, p. 42-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long-term outcomes following vocational rehabilitation treatments in patients with prolonged fatigue

AU - Joosen, M.C.W.

AU - Frings-Dresen, M.H.W.

AU - Sluiter, J.K.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - BackgroundMulti-component vocational rehabilitation (VR) provides positive short-term outcomes in patients with prolonged fatigue.PurposeThe purpose of this study is to evaluate the long-term outcomes of Dutch multi-component VR up to 18 months after treatment.MethodIn a pre–post-study, measurements were taken before treatment (t0), after treatment (t1) and in long-term follow-ups at 6 (t2), 12 (t3) and 18 months (t4) after treatment. Primary outcomes (fatigue, work participation and workability) and secondary outcomes [physical and social functioning, mental health and heart rate variability (HRV)] were assessed over time using linear mixed models analyses. Post hoc long-term outcomes were compared with t0 and t1.ResultsSixty patients with severe fatigue complaints participated. The primary outcomes significantly (p < 0.001) improved at follow-ups compared with t0 and showed no relapse compared with t1. Moreover, fatigue decreased (p < 0.002) whereas workability (p < 0.001) and work participation (p < 0.001) increased further after treatment (t1). The secondary outcomes, physical functioning, mental health, social functioning and HRV, improved significantly (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.001 and p = 0.049, respectively) over the long term compared with t0. At 6-month follow-up (t2), mental health (p < 0.003) and social functioning (p = 0.003) further increased after the treatment was stopped.ConclusionMulti-component VR treatments seem to significantly and in a clinically relevant way decrease fatigue symptoms and improve individual functioning and work participation in patients with severe prolonged fatigue over the long term and without showing relapse.

AB - BackgroundMulti-component vocational rehabilitation (VR) provides positive short-term outcomes in patients with prolonged fatigue.PurposeThe purpose of this study is to evaluate the long-term outcomes of Dutch multi-component VR up to 18 months after treatment.MethodIn a pre–post-study, measurements were taken before treatment (t0), after treatment (t1) and in long-term follow-ups at 6 (t2), 12 (t3) and 18 months (t4) after treatment. Primary outcomes (fatigue, work participation and workability) and secondary outcomes [physical and social functioning, mental health and heart rate variability (HRV)] were assessed over time using linear mixed models analyses. Post hoc long-term outcomes were compared with t0 and t1.ResultsSixty patients with severe fatigue complaints participated. The primary outcomes significantly (p < 0.001) improved at follow-ups compared with t0 and showed no relapse compared with t1. Moreover, fatigue decreased (p < 0.002) whereas workability (p < 0.001) and work participation (p < 0.001) increased further after treatment (t1). The secondary outcomes, physical functioning, mental health, social functioning and HRV, improved significantly (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.001 and p = 0.049, respectively) over the long term compared with t0. At 6-month follow-up (t2), mental health (p < 0.003) and social functioning (p = 0.003) further increased after the treatment was stopped.ConclusionMulti-component VR treatments seem to significantly and in a clinically relevant way decrease fatigue symptoms and improve individual functioning and work participation in patients with severe prolonged fatigue over the long term and without showing relapse.

U2 - 10.1007/s12529-011-9208-z

DO - 10.1007/s12529-011-9208-z

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 42

EP - 51

JO - International Journal of Behavioral Medicine

JF - International Journal of Behavioral Medicine

SN - 1070-5503

IS - 1

ER -