Longitudinal regret and information satisfaction after deciding on treatment for localized prostate cancer with or without a decision aid. Results at one-year follow-up in the PCPCC trial

M. Cuypers*, R.E.D. Lamers, P.J.M. Kil, L.V. van der Poll-Franse, M. de Vries

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Objective
To investigate the effect of including an online decision aid (DA) during prostate cancer treatment counseling on decisional regret and information satisfaction in a one-year follow-up.

Methods
Within a cluster RCT, 18 Dutch hospitals were randomized to DA counseling or care-as-usual, patients (n = 382) initially completed questionnaires directly after treatment decision making. Six and twelve months later regret (Decisional Regret Scale) and information satisfaction (SCIP-B) were assessed. Anxious and depressive symptoms (HADS) was included as possible covariate.

Results
After 12 months, 43 participants (15%) regretted their treatment choice and 105 participants (36%) were dissatisfied with the information that was received at the time of decision-making, regardless of being exposed to the DA. Anxious and depressive symptoms at follow-up were associated with regret and information dissatisfaction.

Conclusion
No long-term benefical effects emerged from DA usage compared to patients who underwent standard counseling.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)424-428
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume102
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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Keywords

  • Decision aid
  • IMPACT
  • OUTCOMES
  • Patient-reported outcomes
  • Prostate cancer
  • Regret
  • Satisfaction
  • Shared decision making
  • Treatment

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