Mapping aggressive behavior of forensic psychiatric inpatients with self-report and structured staff-monitoring

Stéphanie Klein Tuente*, Stefan Bogaerts, Wim Veling

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
7 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Structured assessment of aggressive behavior in forensic psychiatry is needed. This study investigated staff-observed and self-reported measures to map prevalence and characteristics of aggressive behavior in forensic inpatients and aimed to identify early signs of aggressive outbursts. In this longitudinal study, 120 forensic psychiatric inpatients with a history of aggression were included. Staff monitored aggressive behavior for 30 weeks using the Social Dysfunction and Aggression Scale (SDAS). Patients completed baseline self-report measures on aggression, anger, and impulsivity. Staff monitoring showed that most inpatients displayed moderate (86%) or severe (65%) aggressive behavior at least once, and 37.5% showed physical aggression. Inpatients with a least one physical aggression incident differed from others in self-reported anger, (reactive) aggression, non-planning impulsivity, and sociodemographic and clinical characteristics (e.g., higher prevalence of cluster B personality disorders, and lower intelligence). Two-thirds of the physical aggression incidents were preceded by observations of increased non-physical aggression (SDAS). In forensic psychiatric inpatients with a history of aggression, more than a third of the patients demonstrated at least one occasion of physical aggression during 30 weeks of observation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number113983
Number of pages8
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume301
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Keywords

  • Anger
  • Forensic psychiatry
  • Impulsivity
  • Inpatient aggression
  • Reactive aggression
  • SCALE
  • VERSION
  • VIOLENCE

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Mapping aggressive behavior of forensic psychiatric inpatients with self-report and structured staff-monitoring'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this