Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for people with diabetes and emotional problems: Long-term follow-up findings from the DiaMind randomized controlled trial

J. van Son, I. Nyklicek, V.J.M. Pop, M.C. Blonk, R.J. Erdtsieck, F. Pouwer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Objective
The DiaMind trial showed beneficial immediate effects of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) on emotional distress, but not on diabetes distress and HbA1c. The aim of the present report was to examine if the effects would be sustained after six month follow-up.
Methods
In the DiaMind trial, 139 outpatients with diabetes (type-I or type-II) and a lowered level of emotional well-being were randomized into MBCT (n = 70) or a waiting list with treatment as usual (TAU: n = 69). Primary outcomes were perceived stress, anxiety and depressive symptoms, and diabetes distress. Secondary outcomes were, among others, health status, and glycemic control (HbA1c).
Results
Compared to TAU, MBCT showed sustained reductions at follow-up in perceived stress (p < .001, d = .76), anxiety (p < .001, assessed by HADS d = .83; assessed by POMS d = .92), and HADS depressive symptoms (p = .004, d = .51), but not POMS depressive symptoms when using Bonferroni correction for multiple testing (p = .016, d = .48). No significant between-group effect was found on diabetes distress and HbA1c.
Conclusion
This study showed sustained benefits of MBCT six months after the intervention on emotional distress in people with diabetes and a lowered level of emotional well-being.Keywords: Anxiety, Comorbidity, Diabetes, Depressive symptoms, Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, Randomized controlled trial
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)81-84
JournalJournal of Psychosomatic Research
Volume77
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Depression
Waiting Lists
Comorbidity
Outpatients
4-amino-4'-hydroxylaminodiphenylsulfone

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title = "Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for people with diabetes and emotional problems: Long-term follow-up findings from the DiaMind randomized controlled trial",
abstract = "ObjectiveThe DiaMind trial showed beneficial immediate effects of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) on emotional distress, but not on diabetes distress and HbA1c. The aim of the present report was to examine if the effects would be sustained after six month follow-up.MethodsIn the DiaMind trial, 139 outpatients with diabetes (type-I or type-II) and a lowered level of emotional well-being were randomized into MBCT (n = 70) or a waiting list with treatment as usual (TAU: n = 69). Primary outcomes were perceived stress, anxiety and depressive symptoms, and diabetes distress. Secondary outcomes were, among others, health status, and glycemic control (HbA1c).ResultsCompared to TAU, MBCT showed sustained reductions at follow-up in perceived stress (p < .001, d = .76), anxiety (p < .001, assessed by HADS d = .83; assessed by POMS d = .92), and HADS depressive symptoms (p = .004, d = .51), but not POMS depressive symptoms when using Bonferroni correction for multiple testing (p = .016, d = .48). No significant between-group effect was found on diabetes distress and HbA1c.ConclusionThis study showed sustained benefits of MBCT six months after the intervention on emotional distress in people with diabetes and a lowered level of emotional well-being.Keywords: Anxiety, Comorbidity, Diabetes, Depressive symptoms, Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, Randomized controlled trial",
author = "{van Son}, J. and I. Nyklicek and V.J.M. Pop and M.C. Blonk and R.J. Erdtsieck and F. Pouwer",
year = "2014",
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Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for people with diabetes and emotional problems : Long-term follow-up findings from the DiaMind randomized controlled trial. / van Son, J.; Nyklicek, I.; Pop, V.J.M.; Blonk, M.C.; Erdtsieck, R.J.; Pouwer, F.

In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, Vol. 77, No. 1, 2014, p. 81-84.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for people with diabetes and emotional problems

T2 - Long-term follow-up findings from the DiaMind randomized controlled trial

AU - van Son, J.

AU - Nyklicek, I.

AU - Pop, V.J.M.

AU - Blonk, M.C.

AU - Erdtsieck, R.J.

AU - Pouwer, F.

PY - 2014

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N2 - ObjectiveThe DiaMind trial showed beneficial immediate effects of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) on emotional distress, but not on diabetes distress and HbA1c. The aim of the present report was to examine if the effects would be sustained after six month follow-up.MethodsIn the DiaMind trial, 139 outpatients with diabetes (type-I or type-II) and a lowered level of emotional well-being were randomized into MBCT (n = 70) or a waiting list with treatment as usual (TAU: n = 69). Primary outcomes were perceived stress, anxiety and depressive symptoms, and diabetes distress. Secondary outcomes were, among others, health status, and glycemic control (HbA1c).ResultsCompared to TAU, MBCT showed sustained reductions at follow-up in perceived stress (p < .001, d = .76), anxiety (p < .001, assessed by HADS d = .83; assessed by POMS d = .92), and HADS depressive symptoms (p = .004, d = .51), but not POMS depressive symptoms when using Bonferroni correction for multiple testing (p = .016, d = .48). No significant between-group effect was found on diabetes distress and HbA1c.ConclusionThis study showed sustained benefits of MBCT six months after the intervention on emotional distress in people with diabetes and a lowered level of emotional well-being.Keywords: Anxiety, Comorbidity, Diabetes, Depressive symptoms, Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, Randomized controlled trial

AB - ObjectiveThe DiaMind trial showed beneficial immediate effects of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) on emotional distress, but not on diabetes distress and HbA1c. The aim of the present report was to examine if the effects would be sustained after six month follow-up.MethodsIn the DiaMind trial, 139 outpatients with diabetes (type-I or type-II) and a lowered level of emotional well-being were randomized into MBCT (n = 70) or a waiting list with treatment as usual (TAU: n = 69). Primary outcomes were perceived stress, anxiety and depressive symptoms, and diabetes distress. Secondary outcomes were, among others, health status, and glycemic control (HbA1c).ResultsCompared to TAU, MBCT showed sustained reductions at follow-up in perceived stress (p < .001, d = .76), anxiety (p < .001, assessed by HADS d = .83; assessed by POMS d = .92), and HADS depressive symptoms (p = .004, d = .51), but not POMS depressive symptoms when using Bonferroni correction for multiple testing (p = .016, d = .48). No significant between-group effect was found on diabetes distress and HbA1c.ConclusionThis study showed sustained benefits of MBCT six months after the intervention on emotional distress in people with diabetes and a lowered level of emotional well-being.Keywords: Anxiety, Comorbidity, Diabetes, Depressive symptoms, Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, Randomized controlled trial

U2 - 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2014.03.013

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JO - Journal of Psychosomatic Research

JF - Journal of Psychosomatic Research

SN - 0022-3999

IS - 1

ER -