Mobile phone use in Africa: Implications for inequality and the digital divide

M.J. James

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Traditional consumer theory assumes that welfare occurs at the point where a good is purchased, and this assumption forms a central part of standard neoclassical welfare analysis. This note argues by contrast that the use of products (including technologies) is also a fundamental determinant of the welfare effect of adopting mobile phones in developing countries. To show this, I rely on a new and detailed data set for 11 African countries and reach some important—albeit tentative—conclusions about the consequences of introducing mobile phone use into existing literatures. In particular, this variable offsets the degree of inequality measured only by adoption and reduces the digital divide as compared to the conventional measure.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)113-116
JournalSocial Science Computer Review
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2014

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Mobile phone use in Africa: Implications for inequality and the digital divide'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this