Moral Agency, Conscious Control, and Deliberative Awareness

Maureen Sie*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Recent empirical research results in the behavioral, cognitive, and neurosciences on the oadaptive unconsciouso show that conscious control and deliberative awareness are not all-pervasive aspects of our everyday dealings with one another. Moral philosophers and other scientists have used these insights to put our moral agency to the test. The results of these tests are intriguing: apparently we are not always (or ever?) the moral agents we take ourselves to be. This paper argues in favor of a refinement of our common perception of moral agency that can accommodate these results; however, it also argues against the suggestion that this refined concept is the result of a radical new understanding of our everyday moral practices.

Original languageEnglish
Article number916111421
Pages (from-to)516-531
Number of pages16
JournalInquiry-An interdisciplinary journal of philosophy
Volume52
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Automaticity

Cite this

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Moral Agency, Conscious Control, and Deliberative Awareness. / Sie, Maureen.

In: Inquiry-An interdisciplinary journal of philosophy, Vol. 52, No. 5, 916111421, 2009, p. 516-531.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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