Multiple imputation of missing categorical data using latent class models: State of art

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Abstract

This paper provides an overview of recent proposals for using latent class models for the multiple imputation of missing categorical data in large-scale studies. While latent class (or finite mixture) modeling is mainly known as a clustering tool, it can also be used for density estimation, i.e., to get a good description of the lower- and higher-order associations among the variables in a dataset. For multiple imputation, the latter aspect is essential in order to be able to draw meaningful imputing values from the conditional distribution of the missing data given the observed data.
We explain the general logic underlying the use of latent class analysis for multiple imputation. Moreover, we present several variants developed within either a frequentist or a Bayesian framework, each of which overcomes certain limitations of the standard implementation. The different approaches are illustrated and compared using a real-data psychological assessment application.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)542-576
JournalPsychological Test and Assessment Modeling
Volume57
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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