Multisensory Stimulation to Improve Low- and Higher-Level Sensory Deficits after Stroke

A Systematic Review

Angelica Maria Tinga, Johanna Maria Augusta Visser-Meily, Maarten Jeroen van der Smagt, Stefan Van der Stigchel, Raymond van Ee, Tanja Cornelia Wilhelmina Nijboer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

The aim of this systematic review was to integrate and assess evidence for the effectiveness of multisensory stimulation (i.e., stimulating at least two of the following sensory systems: visual, auditory, and somatosensory) as a possible rehabilitation method after stroke. Evidence was considered with a focus on low-level, perceptual (visual, auditory and somatosensory deficits), as well as higher-level, cognitive, sensory deficits. We referred to the electronic databases Scopus and PubMed to search for articles that were published before May 2015. Studies were included which evaluated the effects of multisensory stimulation on patients with low- or higher-level sensory deficits caused by stroke. Twenty-one studies were included in this review and the quality of these studies was assessed (based on eight elements: randomization, inclusion of control patient group, blinding of participants, blinding of researchers, follow-up, group size, reporting effect sizes, and reporting time post-stroke). Twenty of the twenty-one included studies demonstrate beneficial effects on low- and/or higher-level sensory deficits after stroke. Notwithstanding these beneficial effects, the quality of the studies is insufficient for valid conclusion that multisensory stimulation can be successfully applied as an effective intervention. A valuable and necessary next step would be to set up well-designed randomized controlled trials to examine the effectiveness of multisensory stimulation as an intervention for low- and/or higher-level sensory deficits after stroke. Finally, we consider the potential mechanisms of multisensory stimulation for rehabilitation to guide this future research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-91
Number of pages19
JournalNeuropsychology Review
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Tinga, A. M., Visser-Meily, J. M. A., van der Smagt, M. J., Van der Stigchel, S., van Ee, R., & Nijboer, T. C. W. (2016). Multisensory Stimulation to Improve Low- and Higher-Level Sensory Deficits after Stroke: A Systematic Review. Neuropsychology Review, 26(1), 73-91. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11065-015-9301-1
Tinga, Angelica Maria ; Visser-Meily, Johanna Maria Augusta ; van der Smagt, Maarten Jeroen ; Van der Stigchel, Stefan ; van Ee, Raymond ; Nijboer, Tanja Cornelia Wilhelmina. / Multisensory Stimulation to Improve Low- and Higher-Level Sensory Deficits after Stroke : A Systematic Review. In: Neuropsychology Review. 2016 ; Vol. 26, No. 1. pp. 73-91.
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Tinga, AM, Visser-Meily, JMA, van der Smagt, MJ, Van der Stigchel, S, van Ee, R & Nijboer, TCW 2016, 'Multisensory Stimulation to Improve Low- and Higher-Level Sensory Deficits after Stroke: A Systematic Review', Neuropsychology Review, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 73-91. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11065-015-9301-1

Multisensory Stimulation to Improve Low- and Higher-Level Sensory Deficits after Stroke : A Systematic Review. / Tinga, Angelica Maria; Visser-Meily, Johanna Maria Augusta; van der Smagt, Maarten Jeroen; Van der Stigchel, Stefan; van Ee, Raymond; Nijboer, Tanja Cornelia Wilhelmina.

In: Neuropsychology Review, Vol. 26, No. 1, 2016, p. 73-91.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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