Naming and remembering atypically colored objects: Support for the processing time account for a secondary distinctiveness effect

H.G.W. Westerbeek, M.A.A. van Amelsvoort, A.A. Maes, M.G.J. Swerts

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

241 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The secondary distinctiveness effect is the effect that stimuli that are unusual or different from stored knowledge are remembered better than common stimuli. We investigate the processing time explanation for this effect, i.e., that distinctive stimuli receive more attention and thus more processing time during encoding, by combining methodology from object recognition with memory tasks. Participants in our experiment name common and distinctive items (typically and atypically colored objects), and then memory is tested. Our results replicate the secondary distinctiveness effect, as recognition scores are higher for atypically colored objects than for typical ones. Crucially, analyses of response times in the naming task show that atypically colored objects are processed significantly slower than typical ones. We take these findings as providing support for the processing time hypothesis for the secondary distinctiveness effect.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCogSci 2014
Subtitle of host publicationCognitive Science Meets Artificial Intelligence: Human and Artificial Agents in Interactive Contexts
EditorsPaul Bello, Marcello Guarini, Marjorie McShane, Brian Scassellati
Publication statusPublished - 2014
EventCogSci 2014 - Québec City, Canada
Duration: 23 Jul 201426 Jul 2014

Conference

ConferenceCogSci 2014
CountryCanada
CityQuébec City
Period23/07/1426/07/14

Keywords

  • memory
  • secondary distinctiveness
  • color
  • processing time
  • object recognition

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Naming and remembering atypically colored objects: Support for the processing time account for a secondary distinctiveness effect'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Westerbeek, H. G. W., van Amelsvoort, M. A. A., Maes, A. A., & Swerts, M. G. J. (2014). Naming and remembering atypically colored objects: Support for the processing time account for a secondary distinctiveness effect. In P. Bello, M. Guarini, M. McShane, & B. Scassellati (Eds.), CogSci 2014: Cognitive Science Meets Artificial Intelligence: Human and Artificial Agents in Interactive Contexts http://cognitivesciencesociety.org/conference2014/index.html