Narcissism and popularity among peers: A crosstransition longitudinal study

Astrid M. G. Poorthuis*, M. Slagt, Marcel A. G. van Aken, Jaap Denissen, S. Thomaes

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)
50 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The dual-pathway model posits that narcissism can both benefit and compromise popularity, depending upon whether narcissists’ assertive or adversarial interpersonal tendencies surface in social interaction. A 5-wave longitudinal study followed Dutch adolescents (N = 322, 53% female, Mage = 12.2) who transitioned from primary into secondary school and examined how narcissism, along with self-esteem (measured at the end of primary school),
contributes to cross-transition change in peer-rated popularity. Narcissism predicted rank-order increases in popularity among children with modest self-esteem but decreases in popularity among children with high self-esteem. These effects emerged shortly after the transition and were maintained throughout the school year. The results illustrate how self-esteem can act as a marker for the different faces of youth narcissism.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)282-296
JournalSelf and Identity
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Keywords

  • ADJUSTMENT
  • ADOLESCENTS
  • ASSOCIATIONS
  • CHILDHOOD
  • CHILDREN
  • DISCLOSURE
  • EXPERIENCES
  • Narcissism
  • RELATIONAL AGGRESSION
  • SCHOOL
  • SELF-ESTEEM
  • dual-pathway model
  • popularity
  • self-esteem
  • status

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