Negative appraisals of insulin therapy are common among adults with Type 2 diabetes using insulin

Results from Diabetes MILES - Australia cross-sectional survey

E. Holmes-Truscott, T.C. Skinner, F. Pouwer, J. Speight

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Aim
To identify insulin therapy appraisals among adults with Type 2 diabetes using insulin and how negative appraisals relate to clinical, self-care and psychosocial outcomes.
Methods
Diabetes MILES – Australia 2011 was a national survey of adults with diabetes, focused on behavioural and psychosocial issues. Subgroup analyses were conducted on the responses of 273 adults with Type 2 diabetes using insulin (46% women; mean ± sd age: 59 ± 9 years; diabetes duration: 12 ± 7 years; years using insulin: 4 ± 4). They completed validated measures of insulin therapy appraisals (ITAS), depression (PHQ–9), anxiety (GAD–7), diabetes distress (PAID) and diabetes-specific self-efficacy (DES–SF).ResultsInsulin was perceived to be very important, and its benefits (e.g. improves health) were endorsed by most (82%). Fifty-one per cent believed that taking insulin means their diabetes has become worse; 51% that insulin causes weight gain; 39% that they have ‘failed to manage’ their diabetes. Those with the greatest and least ‘ITAS negative’ scores did not differ by diabetes duration or years using insulin, or by average number of insulin injections or blood glucose checks per day. Those with more negative insulin appraisals were significantly younger (Mean Diff. = 5 years, P < 0.001), less satisfied with recent blood glucose levels (P < 0.001, d = 0.63), had reduced diabetes-specific self-efficacy (P < 0.001, d = 0.7), and were more likely to report depressive symptoms, anxiety or diabetes distress (all P < 0.001, d = 0.65–1.1).
Conclusions
Negative insulin therapy appraisals are common among adults with Type 2 diabetes using insulin, and are associated with lower general and diabetes-specific emotional well-being, reduced diabetes-specific self-efficacy and satisfaction with blood glucose.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1297-1303
JournalDiabetic Medicine: Journal of the British Diabetic Association
Volume32
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression
Weight Gain

Cite this

@article{f5b9b6587a4c4acc83f0bb5c80a6e428,
title = "Negative appraisals of insulin therapy are common among adults with Type 2 diabetes using insulin: Results from Diabetes MILES - Australia cross-sectional survey",
abstract = "AimTo identify insulin therapy appraisals among adults with Type 2 diabetes using insulin and how negative appraisals relate to clinical, self-care and psychosocial outcomes.MethodsDiabetes MILES – Australia 2011 was a national survey of adults with diabetes, focused on behavioural and psychosocial issues. Subgroup analyses were conducted on the responses of 273 adults with Type 2 diabetes using insulin (46{\%} women; mean ± sd age: 59 ± 9 years; diabetes duration: 12 ± 7 years; years using insulin: 4 ± 4). They completed validated measures of insulin therapy appraisals (ITAS), depression (PHQ–9), anxiety (GAD–7), diabetes distress (PAID) and diabetes-specific self-efficacy (DES–SF).ResultsInsulin was perceived to be very important, and its benefits (e.g. improves health) were endorsed by most (82{\%}). Fifty-one per cent believed that taking insulin means their diabetes has become worse; 51{\%} that insulin causes weight gain; 39{\%} that they have ‘failed to manage’ their diabetes. Those with the greatest and least ‘ITAS negative’ scores did not differ by diabetes duration or years using insulin, or by average number of insulin injections or blood glucose checks per day. Those with more negative insulin appraisals were significantly younger (Mean Diff. = 5 years, P < 0.001), less satisfied with recent blood glucose levels (P < 0.001, d = 0.63), had reduced diabetes-specific self-efficacy (P < 0.001, d = 0.7), and were more likely to report depressive symptoms, anxiety or diabetes distress (all P < 0.001, d = 0.65–1.1).ConclusionsNegative insulin therapy appraisals are common among adults with Type 2 diabetes using insulin, and are associated with lower general and diabetes-specific emotional well-being, reduced diabetes-specific self-efficacy and satisfaction with blood glucose.",
author = "E. Holmes-Truscott and T.C. Skinner and F. Pouwer and J. Speight",
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Negative appraisals of insulin therapy are common among adults with Type 2 diabetes using insulin : Results from Diabetes MILES - Australia cross-sectional survey. / Holmes-Truscott, E.; Skinner, T.C.; Pouwer, F.; Speight, J.

In: Diabetic Medicine: Journal of the British Diabetic Association, Vol. 32, No. 10, 2015, p. 1297-1303.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Negative appraisals of insulin therapy are common among adults with Type 2 diabetes using insulin

T2 - Results from Diabetes MILES - Australia cross-sectional survey

AU - Holmes-Truscott, E.

AU - Skinner, T.C.

AU - Pouwer, F.

AU - Speight, J.

PY - 2015

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N2 - AimTo identify insulin therapy appraisals among adults with Type 2 diabetes using insulin and how negative appraisals relate to clinical, self-care and psychosocial outcomes.MethodsDiabetes MILES – Australia 2011 was a national survey of adults with diabetes, focused on behavioural and psychosocial issues. Subgroup analyses were conducted on the responses of 273 adults with Type 2 diabetes using insulin (46% women; mean ± sd age: 59 ± 9 years; diabetes duration: 12 ± 7 years; years using insulin: 4 ± 4). They completed validated measures of insulin therapy appraisals (ITAS), depression (PHQ–9), anxiety (GAD–7), diabetes distress (PAID) and diabetes-specific self-efficacy (DES–SF).ResultsInsulin was perceived to be very important, and its benefits (e.g. improves health) were endorsed by most (82%). Fifty-one per cent believed that taking insulin means their diabetes has become worse; 51% that insulin causes weight gain; 39% that they have ‘failed to manage’ their diabetes. Those with the greatest and least ‘ITAS negative’ scores did not differ by diabetes duration or years using insulin, or by average number of insulin injections or blood glucose checks per day. Those with more negative insulin appraisals were significantly younger (Mean Diff. = 5 years, P < 0.001), less satisfied with recent blood glucose levels (P < 0.001, d = 0.63), had reduced diabetes-specific self-efficacy (P < 0.001, d = 0.7), and were more likely to report depressive symptoms, anxiety or diabetes distress (all P < 0.001, d = 0.65–1.1).ConclusionsNegative insulin therapy appraisals are common among adults with Type 2 diabetes using insulin, and are associated with lower general and diabetes-specific emotional well-being, reduced diabetes-specific self-efficacy and satisfaction with blood glucose.

AB - AimTo identify insulin therapy appraisals among adults with Type 2 diabetes using insulin and how negative appraisals relate to clinical, self-care and psychosocial outcomes.MethodsDiabetes MILES – Australia 2011 was a national survey of adults with diabetes, focused on behavioural and psychosocial issues. Subgroup analyses were conducted on the responses of 273 adults with Type 2 diabetes using insulin (46% women; mean ± sd age: 59 ± 9 years; diabetes duration: 12 ± 7 years; years using insulin: 4 ± 4). They completed validated measures of insulin therapy appraisals (ITAS), depression (PHQ–9), anxiety (GAD–7), diabetes distress (PAID) and diabetes-specific self-efficacy (DES–SF).ResultsInsulin was perceived to be very important, and its benefits (e.g. improves health) were endorsed by most (82%). Fifty-one per cent believed that taking insulin means their diabetes has become worse; 51% that insulin causes weight gain; 39% that they have ‘failed to manage’ their diabetes. Those with the greatest and least ‘ITAS negative’ scores did not differ by diabetes duration or years using insulin, or by average number of insulin injections or blood glucose checks per day. Those with more negative insulin appraisals were significantly younger (Mean Diff. = 5 years, P < 0.001), less satisfied with recent blood glucose levels (P < 0.001, d = 0.63), had reduced diabetes-specific self-efficacy (P < 0.001, d = 0.7), and were more likely to report depressive symptoms, anxiety or diabetes distress (all P < 0.001, d = 0.65–1.1).ConclusionsNegative insulin therapy appraisals are common among adults with Type 2 diabetes using insulin, and are associated with lower general and diabetes-specific emotional well-being, reduced diabetes-specific self-efficacy and satisfaction with blood glucose.

U2 - 10.1111/dme.12729

DO - 10.1111/dme.12729

M3 - Article

VL - 32

SP - 1297

EP - 1303

JO - Diabetic Medicine: Journal of the British Diabetic Association

JF - Diabetic Medicine: Journal of the British Diabetic Association

SN - 0742-3071

IS - 10

ER -