New graduate nurses professional commitment: Antecedents and outcomes

Sylvie Guerrero, Denis Chênevert, S.C. Kilroy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose:
This study examines the factors that increase new graduate nurses' professional commitment and how this professional commitment in turn affects professional turnover intentions, anxiety, and physical health symptoms.
Design:
The study was carried out in association with the nursing undergraduate's affiliation of Quebec, Canada. A three-wave longitudinal design was employed among nursing students. Nurses were surveyed before they entered the labor market, and then twice after they started working.
Methods:
Participants were contacted by post at their home address. The hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling.
Findings and conclusion:
Professional commitment explains why good work characteristics and the provision of organizational resources related to patient care reduce nurses' anxiety and physical symptoms, and increase their professional turnover intentions. Pre-entry professional perceptions moderate the effects of work characteristics on professional commitment such that when participants hold positive pre-entry perceptions about the profession, the propensity to develop professional commitment is higher.
Clinical relevance:
There is a worldwide shortage of nurses. From a nurse training perspective, it is important to create realistic perceptions of the nursing role. In hospitals, providing a good work environment and resources conducive to their professional ethos is critical for ensuring nurses do not leave the profession early on in their careers.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)572-579
JournalJournal of Nursing Scholarship
Volume49
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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