New service development in e-government: Identifying critical success factors

Spyros Angelopoulos, Fotis Kitsios, Thanos Papadopoulos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose
– The purpose of this paper is to suggest a model that incorporates critical factors contributing to the success in new service development (NSD) projects in electronic government (e‐government).

Design/methodology/approach
– After a brief introduction to e‐government and NSD in respect to models for successful implementation, the authors justify and build on the existing literature that advocates the use of critical success factors (CSFs) to study the implementation of these projects. They suggest a model that incorporates the determinants of success or failure for a new service through a set of variables.

Findings
– This paper proposes a framework, which is believed to help with the empirical research of CSF in NSD. The suggested framework attempts to bring experience in leadership and coordination of work theory and practice together by synthesizing the existing literature with real‐life experience.

Research limitations/implications
– The paper contributes to the e‐government implementation literature in terms of suggesting a model that takes under consideration important CSF for implementing NSD.

Practical implications
– The projects a number of implications for public sector scholars as well as administrators. A vast amount of taxpayer money can be saved if decision makers can promptly identify potential waste of funds in prone‐to‐failure projects.

Originality/value
– The research aims at providing a better understanding of the underlying factors and dimensions that describe NSD in e‐government through the suggestion of a model that takes under consideration important CSF for implementing NSD. Therefore, it expands the scope of NSD research in e‐government context, stating the need for more research to be conducted regarding the NSD in e‐government using CSF. By identifying the potential success or failure of future projects a number of implications for public sector scholars as well as administrators comes to light.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-118
JournalTransforming Government: People, Process and Policy
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • Communication technologies
  • Government
  • services
  • critical success factors
  • Public sector organizations

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