Not Extent of Telecommuting, but Job Characteristics as Proximal Predictors of Work-Related Well-Being

Tinne Vander Elst*, Ronny Verhoogen, Maarten Sercu, Anja Van Den Broeck, Elfi Baillien, Lode Godderis

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the curvilinear relationship between extent of telecommuting and work-related well-being (ie, burnout, work engagement, and cognitive stress complaints), as well as to test whether job characteristics act as explanatory mechanisms underlying this relationship. Methods: A sample of 878 employees from an international telecommunication company with a long history of telecommuting participated in a survey on psychosocial risk factors and well-being at work. Mediation path analyses were conducted to test the hypotheses. Results: Social support from colleagues, participation in decision-making, task autonomy, and work-to-family conflict, but not extent of telecommuting, were directly related to work-related well-being. Extent of telecommuting was indirectly related to well-being via social support. Conclusion: Employers should invest in creating good work environments in general, among both telecommuters and nontelecommuters.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e180-e186
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume59
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2017
Externally publishedYes

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