Obsessive-compulsive symptoms in children and adolescents: symptomatology, impairment and quality of life

Elien De Caluwe*, Barbara De Clercq

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)
6 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Although the "presence of obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptoms" and "OC-related impairment" are the main criteria to diagnose obsessive-compulsive disorder, the significance of symptomatology versus impairment in explaining quality of life remains unclear. The present study relies on two samples including 462 children (8-11 years old) and 265 children and adolescents (10-17 years old) and explores how self-ratings of specific OC symptoms and OC impairment are associated with father ratings of childhood quality of life. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to investigate the additive effect of OC impairment beyond OC symptomatology (and vice versa) in predicting quality of life. The results demonstrated that specific OC symptoms and OC impairment are differentially related to quality of life, underscoring the additive value of OC impairment beyond OC symptomatology, whereas the reverse was not the case. This finding highlights the importance of measuring impairment besides symptomatology to identify those OC features in childhood that are most significantly related to decreased quality of life.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1389-1398
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume24
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Obsessive-compulsive symptoms
  • Children
  • Adolescents
  • Symptomatology
  • Impairment
  • Quality of life
  • MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER
  • FUNCTIONAL IMPAIRMENT
  • ANXIETY DISORDERS
  • PERSONALITY-DISORDER
  • VALIDATION
  • AGREEMENT
  • IMPACT
  • SCALE
  • PSYCHOPATHOLOGY
  • ANTECEDENTS

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