On the course of goal pursuit: The influence of goal progress on explicit judgments of self-agency

Anneloes Kip*, Demi Blom, Anouk van der Weiden

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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    Abstract

    The experience of causing our own actions and resulting outcomes (i.e., self-agency) is essential for the regulation of our actions during goal pursuit. In two experiments, participants indicated experienced self-agency over presented outcomes, which varied in distance to their goal in an agency-ambiguous task. In Study 1, progress was manipulated at trial level (i.e., stimuli moved randomly or sequentially towards the goal). In Study 2, progress was constant at trial level (sequential), but varied at task level (i.e., goal discrepancy of the outcomes was random or decreased over trials). Study 1 showed that self-agency gradually increased in the progress condition as unsuccessful outcomes were objectively closer to the goal, while self-agency increased exponentially upon full goal attainment in the absence of progress. The gradual pattern for the progress condition was replicated in Study 2. These studies indicate that explicit judgments of self-agency are more flexible when there is goal progress.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article number103222
    Number of pages15
    JournalConsciousness and Cognition
    Volume96
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2021

    Keywords

    • AUTHORSHIP
    • CONSEQUENCES
    • CRITICISM
    • Discrepancy
    • EFFICACY
    • EXPERIENCES
    • FEEDBACK
    • Goal progress
    • Goal pursuit
    • INFERENCE
    • KNOWLEDGE
    • MODEL
    • PRIMES
    • Self-agency
    • Self-regulation

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