Online video game addiction: Identification of addicted adolescent gamers

Antonius J. van Rooij, Tim M. Schoenmakers, Ad A. Vermulst, Regina J. J. M. van den Eijnden, Dike van de Mheen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Aims

To provide empirical data-driven identification of a group of addicted online gamers.

Design

Repeated cross-sectional survey study, comprising a longitudinal cohort, conducted in 2008 and 2009.

Setting

Secondary schools in the Netherlands.

Participants

Two large samples of Dutch schoolchildren (aged 13-16 years).

Measurements

Compulsive internet use scale, weekly hours of online gaming and psychosocial variables.

Findings

This study confirms the existence of a small group of addicted online gamers (3%), representing about 1.5% of all children aged 13-16 years in the Netherlands. Although these gamers report addiction-like problems, relationships with decreased psychosocial health were less evident.

Conclusions

The identification of a small group of addicted online gamers supports efforts to develop and validate questionnaire scales aimed at measuring the phenomenon of online video game addiction. The findings contribute to the discussion on the inclusion of non-substance addictions in the proposed unified concept of 'Addiction and Related Disorders' for the DSM-V by providing indirect identification and validation of a group of suspected online video game addicts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205-212
JournalAddiction
Volume106
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Compulsive internet use
  • internet addiction
  • latent class analysis
  • non-substance addiction
  • online video games
  • psychosocial health
  • video game addiction
  • PROBLEMATIC INTERNET USE
  • LATENT CLASS ANALYSIS
  • SOCIAL-ANXIETY-SCALE
  • CONCURRENT VALIDITY
  • SYMPTOMS
  • LONELINESS
  • CHILDREN
  • MODELS

Cite this

van Rooij, A. J., Schoenmakers, T. M., Vermulst, A. A., van den Eijnden, R. J. J. M., & van de Mheen, D. (2011). Online video game addiction: Identification of addicted adolescent gamers. Addiction, 106(1), 205-212. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2010.03104.x
van Rooij, Antonius J. ; Schoenmakers, Tim M. ; Vermulst, Ad A. ; van den Eijnden, Regina J. J. M. ; van de Mheen, Dike. / Online video game addiction : Identification of addicted adolescent gamers. In: Addiction. 2011 ; Vol. 106, No. 1. pp. 205-212.
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abstract = "AimsTo provide empirical data-driven identification of a group of addicted online gamers.DesignRepeated cross-sectional survey study, comprising a longitudinal cohort, conducted in 2008 and 2009.SettingSecondary schools in the Netherlands.ParticipantsTwo large samples of Dutch schoolchildren (aged 13-16 years).MeasurementsCompulsive internet use scale, weekly hours of online gaming and psychosocial variables.FindingsThis study confirms the existence of a small group of addicted online gamers (3{\%}), representing about 1.5{\%} of all children aged 13-16 years in the Netherlands. Although these gamers report addiction-like problems, relationships with decreased psychosocial health were less evident.ConclusionsThe identification of a small group of addicted online gamers supports efforts to develop and validate questionnaire scales aimed at measuring the phenomenon of online video game addiction. The findings contribute to the discussion on the inclusion of non-substance addictions in the proposed unified concept of 'Addiction and Related Disorders' for the DSM-V by providing indirect identification and validation of a group of suspected online video game addicts.",
keywords = "Compulsive internet use, internet addiction, latent class analysis, non-substance addiction, online video games, psychosocial health, video game addiction, PROBLEMATIC INTERNET USE, LATENT CLASS ANALYSIS, SOCIAL-ANXIETY-SCALE, CONCURRENT VALIDITY, SYMPTOMS, LONELINESS, CHILDREN, MODELS",
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van Rooij, AJ, Schoenmakers, TM, Vermulst, AA, van den Eijnden, RJJM & van de Mheen, D 2011, 'Online video game addiction: Identification of addicted adolescent gamers' Addiction, vol. 106, no. 1, pp. 205-212. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2010.03104.x

Online video game addiction : Identification of addicted adolescent gamers. / van Rooij, Antonius J.; Schoenmakers, Tim M.; Vermulst, Ad A.; van den Eijnden, Regina J. J. M.; van de Mheen, Dike.

In: Addiction, Vol. 106, No. 1, 2011, p. 205-212.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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AU - van Rooij, Antonius J.

AU - Schoenmakers, Tim M.

AU - Vermulst, Ad A.

AU - van den Eijnden, Regina J. J. M.

AU - van de Mheen, Dike

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - AimsTo provide empirical data-driven identification of a group of addicted online gamers.DesignRepeated cross-sectional survey study, comprising a longitudinal cohort, conducted in 2008 and 2009.SettingSecondary schools in the Netherlands.ParticipantsTwo large samples of Dutch schoolchildren (aged 13-16 years).MeasurementsCompulsive internet use scale, weekly hours of online gaming and psychosocial variables.FindingsThis study confirms the existence of a small group of addicted online gamers (3%), representing about 1.5% of all children aged 13-16 years in the Netherlands. Although these gamers report addiction-like problems, relationships with decreased psychosocial health were less evident.ConclusionsThe identification of a small group of addicted online gamers supports efforts to develop and validate questionnaire scales aimed at measuring the phenomenon of online video game addiction. The findings contribute to the discussion on the inclusion of non-substance addictions in the proposed unified concept of 'Addiction and Related Disorders' for the DSM-V by providing indirect identification and validation of a group of suspected online video game addicts.

AB - AimsTo provide empirical data-driven identification of a group of addicted online gamers.DesignRepeated cross-sectional survey study, comprising a longitudinal cohort, conducted in 2008 and 2009.SettingSecondary schools in the Netherlands.ParticipantsTwo large samples of Dutch schoolchildren (aged 13-16 years).MeasurementsCompulsive internet use scale, weekly hours of online gaming and psychosocial variables.FindingsThis study confirms the existence of a small group of addicted online gamers (3%), representing about 1.5% of all children aged 13-16 years in the Netherlands. Although these gamers report addiction-like problems, relationships with decreased psychosocial health were less evident.ConclusionsThe identification of a small group of addicted online gamers supports efforts to develop and validate questionnaire scales aimed at measuring the phenomenon of online video game addiction. The findings contribute to the discussion on the inclusion of non-substance addictions in the proposed unified concept of 'Addiction and Related Disorders' for the DSM-V by providing indirect identification and validation of a group of suspected online video game addicts.

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KW - PROBLEMATIC INTERNET USE

KW - LATENT CLASS ANALYSIS

KW - SOCIAL-ANXIETY-SCALE

KW - CONCURRENT VALIDITY

KW - SYMPTOMS

KW - LONELINESS

KW - CHILDREN

KW - MODELS

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M3 - Article

VL - 106

SP - 205

EP - 212

JO - Addiction

JF - Addiction

SN - 0965-2140

IS - 1

ER -