Optimal signal bandwidth for the recording of surface EMG activity of facial, jaw, oral, and neck muscles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Spontaneous pericranial electromyographic (EMG) activity is generally small and is contaminated by strong low-frequency artifacts. High-pass filtering should suppress artifacts but affect EMG signal power only minimally. In 24 subjects who performed a warned simple reaction time task, the optimal high-pass cut-off frequency was examined for nine different pericranial muscles. From four experimental conditions (visual and auditory reaction signals combined with hand and foot responses), 1-min EMG recordings were selected (bandwidth: 0.4¿512 Hz) and divided into 60 1-s data segments. These segments were high-pass filtered, the [minus sign]3-dB cut-off frequency varying from 5 to 90 Hz, and subjected to power spectral analysis. Optimal high-pass filter frequencies were determined for the mean power spectra based on visual estimation or comparison with a theoretical spectrum of the artifact-free EMG signal. The optimal frequencies for the different muscles varied between 15 and 25 Hz and were not influenced by stimulus or response modality. For all muscles, a low-pass filter frequency between 400 and 500 Hz was appropriate.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)22-34
JournalPsychophysiology
Volume38
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2001

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Neck Muscles
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title = "Optimal signal bandwidth for the recording of surface EMG activity of facial, jaw, oral, and neck muscles",
abstract = "Spontaneous pericranial electromyographic (EMG) activity is generally small and is contaminated by strong low-frequency artifacts. High-pass filtering should suppress artifacts but affect EMG signal power only minimally. In 24 subjects who performed a warned simple reaction time task, the optimal high-pass cut-off frequency was examined for nine different pericranial muscles. From four experimental conditions (visual and auditory reaction signals combined with hand and foot responses), 1-min EMG recordings were selected (bandwidth: 0.4¿512 Hz) and divided into 60 1-s data segments. These segments were high-pass filtered, the [minus sign]3-dB cut-off frequency varying from 5 to 90 Hz, and subjected to power spectral analysis. Optimal high-pass filter frequencies were determined for the mean power spectra based on visual estimation or comparison with a theoretical spectrum of the artifact-free EMG signal. The optimal frequencies for the different muscles varied between 15 and 25 Hz and were not influenced by stimulus or response modality. For all muscles, a low-pass filter frequency between 400 and 500 Hz was appropriate.",
author = "{van Boxtel}, A.",
year = "2001",
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volume = "38",
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}

Optimal signal bandwidth for the recording of surface EMG activity of facial, jaw, oral, and neck muscles. / van Boxtel, A.

In: Psychophysiology, Vol. 38, No. 1, 2001, p. 22-34.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

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PY - 2001

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AB - Spontaneous pericranial electromyographic (EMG) activity is generally small and is contaminated by strong low-frequency artifacts. High-pass filtering should suppress artifacts but affect EMG signal power only minimally. In 24 subjects who performed a warned simple reaction time task, the optimal high-pass cut-off frequency was examined for nine different pericranial muscles. From four experimental conditions (visual and auditory reaction signals combined with hand and foot responses), 1-min EMG recordings were selected (bandwidth: 0.4¿512 Hz) and divided into 60 1-s data segments. These segments were high-pass filtered, the [minus sign]3-dB cut-off frequency varying from 5 to 90 Hz, and subjected to power spectral analysis. Optimal high-pass filter frequencies were determined for the mean power spectra based on visual estimation or comparison with a theoretical spectrum of the artifact-free EMG signal. The optimal frequencies for the different muscles varied between 15 and 25 Hz and were not influenced by stimulus or response modality. For all muscles, a low-pass filter frequency between 400 and 500 Hz was appropriate.

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