Parental marital dissolution and the intergenerational transmission of homeownership

C.G.T.M. Hubers, C.L. Dewilde, P.M. De Graaf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children of homeowners are more likely to enter homeownership than are children whose parents rent. We investigate whether this association is dependent on parental divorce, focusing on parental assistance as a conduit of intergenerational transmission. Event history analyses of data for England and Wales from the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) show that the intergenerational transmission of homeownership is stronger for children of divorced parents compared with children of married parents. Such an effect may arise from two channels: (1) children of divorced parents are more in need of parental assistance due to socio-economic disadvantages associated with parental divorce; and (2) compared with married parents, divorced homeowning parents (mothers) rely more on housing wealth, rather than financial wealth, for assisting children. Findings support both explanations. Children of divorced parents are furthermore less likely to co-reside. We find limited evidence that when they do, co-residence is less conductive to homeownership compared with children from married parents.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)247-283
JournalHousing Studies
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • 1ST-TIME HOME-OWNERSHIP
  • ADULT CHILDREN
  • BRITAIN
  • British Household Panel Survey
  • DIVORCE
  • FAMILY
  • Intergenerational transmission of homeownership
  • LATER-LIFE
  • LONGITUDINAL ANALYSIS
  • SUPPORT
  • TRANSFERS
  • YOUNG-ADULTS
  • event history analysis
  • first-time homeownership
  • parental divorce

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