Part-time jobs: What women want?

A.L. Booth, J.C. van Ours

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Part-time jobs are common among partnered women in many countries. There are two opposing views on the efficiency implications of so many women working part-time. The negative view is that part-time jobs imply wastage of resources and underutilization of investments in human capital since many part-time working women are highly educated. The positive view is that, without the existence of part-time jobs, female labor force participation would be substantially lower since women confronted with the choice between a full-time job and zero working hours would opt for the latter. In the Netherlands, the majority of partnered working women have a part-time job. Our paper investigates, from a supply-side perspective, if the current situation of abundant part-time work in the Netherlands is likely to be a transitional phase that will culminate in many women working full-time. Our main results indicate that partnered women in part-time work have high levels of job satisfaction, a low desire to change their working hours, and live in partnerships in which household production is highly gendered. Taken together, our results suggest that part-time jobs are what most Dutch women want.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)263-283
JournalJournal of Population Economics
Volume26
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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working woman
part-time work
working hours
Netherlands
time
female labor force
labor force participation
job satisfaction
human capital
supply
efficiency
resources
Working hours
The Netherlands

Cite this

Booth, A. L., & van Ours, J. C. (2013). Part-time jobs: What women want? Journal of Population Economics, 26(1), 263-283.
Booth, A.L. ; van Ours, J.C. / Part-time jobs : What women want?. In: Journal of Population Economics. 2013 ; Vol. 26, No. 1. pp. 263-283.
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abstract = "Part-time jobs are common among partnered women in many countries. There are two opposing views on the efficiency implications of so many women working part-time. The negative view is that part-time jobs imply wastage of resources and underutilization of investments in human capital since many part-time working women are highly educated. The positive view is that, without the existence of part-time jobs, female labor force participation would be substantially lower since women confronted with the choice between a full-time job and zero working hours would opt for the latter. In the Netherlands, the majority of partnered working women have a part-time job. Our paper investigates, from a supply-side perspective, if the current situation of abundant part-time work in the Netherlands is likely to be a transitional phase that will culminate in many women working full-time. Our main results indicate that partnered women in part-time work have high levels of job satisfaction, a low desire to change their working hours, and live in partnerships in which household production is highly gendered. Taken together, our results suggest that part-time jobs are what most Dutch women want.",
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Booth, AL & van Ours, JC 2013, 'Part-time jobs: What women want?', Journal of Population Economics, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 263-283.

Part-time jobs : What women want? / Booth, A.L.; van Ours, J.C.

In: Journal of Population Economics, Vol. 26, No. 1, 2013, p. 263-283.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Part-time jobs

T2 - What women want?

AU - Booth, A.L.

AU - van Ours, J.C.

N1 - Appeared earlier as CentER Discussion Paper 2010-005

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

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AB - Part-time jobs are common among partnered women in many countries. There are two opposing views on the efficiency implications of so many women working part-time. The negative view is that part-time jobs imply wastage of resources and underutilization of investments in human capital since many part-time working women are highly educated. The positive view is that, without the existence of part-time jobs, female labor force participation would be substantially lower since women confronted with the choice between a full-time job and zero working hours would opt for the latter. In the Netherlands, the majority of partnered working women have a part-time job. Our paper investigates, from a supply-side perspective, if the current situation of abundant part-time work in the Netherlands is likely to be a transitional phase that will culminate in many women working full-time. Our main results indicate that partnered women in part-time work have high levels of job satisfaction, a low desire to change their working hours, and live in partnerships in which household production is highly gendered. Taken together, our results suggest that part-time jobs are what most Dutch women want.

M3 - Article

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Booth AL, van Ours JC. Part-time jobs: What women want? Journal of Population Economics. 2013;26(1):263-283.