Perceived health status associated with transport choice for short distance trips

C E Scheepers, G C W Wendel-Vos, P J V van Wesemael, F R J den Hertog, H L Stipdonk, L L R Int Panis, E E M M van Kempen, A.J. Schuit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Background:

This study examines the association between active transport and perceived general health, perceived psychological wellbeing and a healthy body weight in the Netherlands.

Methods:

Data were collected by an online questionnaire (N = 3663) in the Netherlands. Data collection was conducted over a period of one calendar year starting July 2012. Logistic regression analyses were used to investigate the association between choice of transport mode (bicycling vs car use and walking vs car use) and perceived general health, perceived psychological wellbeing and having a healthy weight respectively. The presented OR's may be interpreted as the likelihood of an average person in our dataset to have a better perceived health or body weight when choosing active transport (either bicycling or walking) over using the car for trips up to 7.5 km.

Results:

Cycling was found to be significantly associated with a better perceived general health (OR = 1.35, 95%CI:1.07-1.70) and having a healthy body weight (OR = 1.52, 95%CI:1.28-1.79), but not with a better perceived psychological wellbeing (OR = 1.12, 95%CI:0.93-1.34). Walking was found to be significantly associated with having a healthy body weight (OR = 1.35, 95%CI:1.09-1.69), but not with a better perceived general (OR = 1.12, 95%CI:0.84-1.51) or psychological wellbeing (OR = 0.85, 95%CI:0.67-1.08).

Conclusion:

Our results suggest that active transport use has been associated with a better perceived general health and a healthy body weight. However, more research is needed to be able to elucidate which factors cause this better health. No associations were observed between transport choice and perceived psychological wellbeing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)839-844
JournalInternational Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Netherlands
Logistic Models
Weights and Measures
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Journal Article

Cite this

Scheepers, C. E., Wendel-Vos, G. C. W., van Wesemael, P. J. V., den Hertog, F. R. J., Stipdonk, H. L., Int Panis, L. L. R., ... Schuit, A. J. (2015). Perceived health status associated with transport choice for short distance trips. International Journal of Preventive Medicine, 2, 839-844. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.09.013
Scheepers, C E ; Wendel-Vos, G C W ; van Wesemael, P J V ; den Hertog, F R J ; Stipdonk, H L ; Int Panis, L L R ; van Kempen, E E M M ; Schuit, A.J. / Perceived health status associated with transport choice for short distance trips. In: International Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 2. pp. 839-844.
@article{29b6b6b2ff3d4600a69ef0bfc15ca887,
title = "Perceived health status associated with transport choice for short distance trips",
abstract = "Background: This study examines the association between active transport and perceived general health, perceived psychological wellbeing and a healthy body weight in the Netherlands.Methods: Data were collected by an online questionnaire (N = 3663) in the Netherlands. Data collection was conducted over a period of one calendar year starting July 2012. Logistic regression analyses were used to investigate the association between choice of transport mode (bicycling vs car use and walking vs car use) and perceived general health, perceived psychological wellbeing and having a healthy weight respectively. The presented OR's may be interpreted as the likelihood of an average person in our dataset to have a better perceived health or body weight when choosing active transport (either bicycling or walking) over using the car for trips up to 7.5 km.Results: Cycling was found to be significantly associated with a better perceived general health (OR = 1.35, 95{\%}CI:1.07-1.70) and having a healthy body weight (OR = 1.52, 95{\%}CI:1.28-1.79), but not with a better perceived psychological wellbeing (OR = 1.12, 95{\%}CI:0.93-1.34). Walking was found to be significantly associated with having a healthy body weight (OR = 1.35, 95{\%}CI:1.09-1.69), but not with a better perceived general (OR = 1.12, 95{\%}CI:0.84-1.51) or psychological wellbeing (OR = 0.85, 95{\%}CI:0.67-1.08).Conclusion: Our results suggest that active transport use has been associated with a better perceived general health and a healthy body weight. However, more research is needed to be able to elucidate which factors cause this better health. No associations were observed between transport choice and perceived psychological wellbeing.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Scheepers, {C E} and Wendel-Vos, {G C W} and {van Wesemael}, {P J V} and {den Hertog}, {F R J} and Stipdonk, {H L} and {Int Panis}, {L L R} and {van Kempen}, {E E M M} and A.J. Schuit",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.09.013",
language = "English",
volume = "2",
pages = "839--844",
journal = "International Journal of Preventive Medicine",
issn = "2008-7802",
publisher = "Isfahan University of Medical Sciences(IUMS)",

}

Scheepers, CE, Wendel-Vos, GCW, van Wesemael, PJV, den Hertog, FRJ, Stipdonk, HL, Int Panis, LLR, van Kempen, EEMM & Schuit, AJ 2015, 'Perceived health status associated with transport choice for short distance trips', International Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 2, pp. 839-844. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.09.013

Perceived health status associated with transport choice for short distance trips. / Scheepers, C E; Wendel-Vos, G C W; van Wesemael, P J V; den Hertog, F R J; Stipdonk, H L; Int Panis, L L R; van Kempen, E E M M; Schuit, A.J.

In: International Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 2, 2015, p. 839-844.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Perceived health status associated with transport choice for short distance trips

AU - Scheepers, C E

AU - Wendel-Vos, G C W

AU - van Wesemael, P J V

AU - den Hertog, F R J

AU - Stipdonk, H L

AU - Int Panis, L L R

AU - van Kempen, E E M M

AU - Schuit, A.J.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Background: This study examines the association between active transport and perceived general health, perceived psychological wellbeing and a healthy body weight in the Netherlands.Methods: Data were collected by an online questionnaire (N = 3663) in the Netherlands. Data collection was conducted over a period of one calendar year starting July 2012. Logistic regression analyses were used to investigate the association between choice of transport mode (bicycling vs car use and walking vs car use) and perceived general health, perceived psychological wellbeing and having a healthy weight respectively. The presented OR's may be interpreted as the likelihood of an average person in our dataset to have a better perceived health or body weight when choosing active transport (either bicycling or walking) over using the car for trips up to 7.5 km.Results: Cycling was found to be significantly associated with a better perceived general health (OR = 1.35, 95%CI:1.07-1.70) and having a healthy body weight (OR = 1.52, 95%CI:1.28-1.79), but not with a better perceived psychological wellbeing (OR = 1.12, 95%CI:0.93-1.34). Walking was found to be significantly associated with having a healthy body weight (OR = 1.35, 95%CI:1.09-1.69), but not with a better perceived general (OR = 1.12, 95%CI:0.84-1.51) or psychological wellbeing (OR = 0.85, 95%CI:0.67-1.08).Conclusion: Our results suggest that active transport use has been associated with a better perceived general health and a healthy body weight. However, more research is needed to be able to elucidate which factors cause this better health. No associations were observed between transport choice and perceived psychological wellbeing.

AB - Background: This study examines the association between active transport and perceived general health, perceived psychological wellbeing and a healthy body weight in the Netherlands.Methods: Data were collected by an online questionnaire (N = 3663) in the Netherlands. Data collection was conducted over a period of one calendar year starting July 2012. Logistic regression analyses were used to investigate the association between choice of transport mode (bicycling vs car use and walking vs car use) and perceived general health, perceived psychological wellbeing and having a healthy weight respectively. The presented OR's may be interpreted as the likelihood of an average person in our dataset to have a better perceived health or body weight when choosing active transport (either bicycling or walking) over using the car for trips up to 7.5 km.Results: Cycling was found to be significantly associated with a better perceived general health (OR = 1.35, 95%CI:1.07-1.70) and having a healthy body weight (OR = 1.52, 95%CI:1.28-1.79), but not with a better perceived psychological wellbeing (OR = 1.12, 95%CI:0.93-1.34). Walking was found to be significantly associated with having a healthy body weight (OR = 1.35, 95%CI:1.09-1.69), but not with a better perceived general (OR = 1.12, 95%CI:0.84-1.51) or psychological wellbeing (OR = 0.85, 95%CI:0.67-1.08).Conclusion: Our results suggest that active transport use has been associated with a better perceived general health and a healthy body weight. However, more research is needed to be able to elucidate which factors cause this better health. No associations were observed between transport choice and perceived psychological wellbeing.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.09.013

DO - 10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.09.013

M3 - Article

VL - 2

SP - 839

EP - 844

JO - International Journal of Preventive Medicine

JF - International Journal of Preventive Medicine

SN - 2008-7802

ER -

Scheepers CE, Wendel-Vos GCW, van Wesemael PJV, den Hertog FRJ, Stipdonk HL, Int Panis LLR et al. Perceived health status associated with transport choice for short distance trips. International Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2015;2:839-844. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.09.013