Perception of Acoustic Emotion Cues in Normal Hearing Listeners and Cochlear Implant Users

Steven Gilbers, Christina Fuller, M. Broersma, M.B. Goudbeek, Rolien Free, Deniz Başkent

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractOther research output

Abstract

Due to the limitations in sound transmission in the electrode-nerve interface, cochlear implant users are unable to fully perceive the acoustic emotion cues in speech. Therefore, it has been suggested that they use different perceptual strategies than normal-hearing listeners, namely by adapting the relative importance of vocal emotion cues (Winn, Chatterjee & Idsardi, 2011). The present study investigates whether normal-hearing listeners and cochlear-implant users indeed employ different emotion recognition strategies. To this end, voice actors were recorded pronouncing a nonce word in multiple emotions. These recordings’ pitch-related acoustic cues were analyzed phonetically, and the recordings were used to test normal-hearing listeners’ and cochlear-implant users’ emotion recognition. Subsequently, these analyses’ results were used to model both groups’ perceptual strategies.Normal-hearing listeners outperformed cochlear-implant users in emotion recognition, even when presented with cochlear-implant simulated stimuli. Unlike cochlear-implant users, however, normal-hearing listeners recognized one particular actor’s emotionsworse than the other actors’. The groups thus behaved differently when presented with similar input, supporting the different strategies hypothesis. Considering the respective speaker’s deviating pronunciation regarding mean pitch and pitch range, it appears that for normal-hearing listeners, mean pitch is a more salient cue than pitch range, whereas cochlear-implant users are biased towards pitch range cues.
Original languageEnglish
Pages28
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2014
EventBias in Auditory Perception Conference - Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark, Denmark
Duration: 18 Sep 201420 Sep 2014

Conference

ConferenceBias in Auditory Perception Conference
CountryDenmark
CityAarhus, Denmark
Period18/09/1420/09/14

Fingerprint

Cochlear implants
Audition
Acoustics
Acoustic waves
Electrodes

Cite this

Gilbers, S., Fuller, C., Broersma, M., Goudbeek, M. B., Free, R., & Başkent, D. (2014). Perception of Acoustic Emotion Cues in Normal Hearing Listeners and Cochlear Implant Users. 28. Abstract from Bias in Auditory Perception Conference, Aarhus, Denmark, Denmark.
Gilbers, Steven ; Fuller, Christina ; Broersma, M. ; Goudbeek, M.B. ; Free, Rolien ; Başkent, Deniz. / Perception of Acoustic Emotion Cues in Normal Hearing Listeners and Cochlear Implant Users. Abstract from Bias in Auditory Perception Conference, Aarhus, Denmark, Denmark.1 p.
@conference{556e5c382dbd4526982d50632db35d78,
title = "Perception of Acoustic Emotion Cues in Normal Hearing Listeners and Cochlear Implant Users",
abstract = "Due to the limitations in sound transmission in the electrode-nerve interface, cochlear implant users are unable to fully perceive the acoustic emotion cues in speech. Therefore, it has been suggested that they use different perceptual strategies than normal-hearing listeners, namely by adapting the relative importance of vocal emotion cues (Winn, Chatterjee & Idsardi, 2011). The present study investigates whether normal-hearing listeners and cochlear-implant users indeed employ different emotion recognition strategies. To this end, voice actors were recorded pronouncing a nonce word in multiple emotions. These recordings’ pitch-related acoustic cues were analyzed phonetically, and the recordings were used to test normal-hearing listeners’ and cochlear-implant users’ emotion recognition. Subsequently, these analyses’ results were used to model both groups’ perceptual strategies.Normal-hearing listeners outperformed cochlear-implant users in emotion recognition, even when presented with cochlear-implant simulated stimuli. Unlike cochlear-implant users, however, normal-hearing listeners recognized one particular actor’s emotionsworse than the other actors’. The groups thus behaved differently when presented with similar input, supporting the different strategies hypothesis. Considering the respective speaker’s deviating pronunciation regarding mean pitch and pitch range, it appears that for normal-hearing listeners, mean pitch is a more salient cue than pitch range, whereas cochlear-implant users are biased towards pitch range cues.",
author = "Steven Gilbers and Christina Fuller and M. Broersma and M.B. Goudbeek and Rolien Free and Deniz Başkent",
year = "2014",
language = "English",
pages = "28",
note = "Bias in Auditory Perception Conference ; Conference date: 18-09-2014 Through 20-09-2014",

}

Gilbers, S, Fuller, C, Broersma, M, Goudbeek, MB, Free, R & Başkent, D 2014, 'Perception of Acoustic Emotion Cues in Normal Hearing Listeners and Cochlear Implant Users' Bias in Auditory Perception Conference, Aarhus, Denmark, Denmark, 18/09/14 - 20/09/14, pp. 28.

Perception of Acoustic Emotion Cues in Normal Hearing Listeners and Cochlear Implant Users. / Gilbers, Steven; Fuller, Christina; Broersma, M.; Goudbeek, M.B.; Free, Rolien; Başkent, Deniz.

2014. 28 Abstract from Bias in Auditory Perception Conference, Aarhus, Denmark, Denmark.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractOther research output

TY - CONF

T1 - Perception of Acoustic Emotion Cues in Normal Hearing Listeners and Cochlear Implant Users

AU - Gilbers, Steven

AU - Fuller, Christina

AU - Broersma, M.

AU - Goudbeek, M.B.

AU - Free, Rolien

AU - Başkent, Deniz

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Due to the limitations in sound transmission in the electrode-nerve interface, cochlear implant users are unable to fully perceive the acoustic emotion cues in speech. Therefore, it has been suggested that they use different perceptual strategies than normal-hearing listeners, namely by adapting the relative importance of vocal emotion cues (Winn, Chatterjee & Idsardi, 2011). The present study investigates whether normal-hearing listeners and cochlear-implant users indeed employ different emotion recognition strategies. To this end, voice actors were recorded pronouncing a nonce word in multiple emotions. These recordings’ pitch-related acoustic cues were analyzed phonetically, and the recordings were used to test normal-hearing listeners’ and cochlear-implant users’ emotion recognition. Subsequently, these analyses’ results were used to model both groups’ perceptual strategies.Normal-hearing listeners outperformed cochlear-implant users in emotion recognition, even when presented with cochlear-implant simulated stimuli. Unlike cochlear-implant users, however, normal-hearing listeners recognized one particular actor’s emotionsworse than the other actors’. The groups thus behaved differently when presented with similar input, supporting the different strategies hypothesis. Considering the respective speaker’s deviating pronunciation regarding mean pitch and pitch range, it appears that for normal-hearing listeners, mean pitch is a more salient cue than pitch range, whereas cochlear-implant users are biased towards pitch range cues.

AB - Due to the limitations in sound transmission in the electrode-nerve interface, cochlear implant users are unable to fully perceive the acoustic emotion cues in speech. Therefore, it has been suggested that they use different perceptual strategies than normal-hearing listeners, namely by adapting the relative importance of vocal emotion cues (Winn, Chatterjee & Idsardi, 2011). The present study investigates whether normal-hearing listeners and cochlear-implant users indeed employ different emotion recognition strategies. To this end, voice actors were recorded pronouncing a nonce word in multiple emotions. These recordings’ pitch-related acoustic cues were analyzed phonetically, and the recordings were used to test normal-hearing listeners’ and cochlear-implant users’ emotion recognition. Subsequently, these analyses’ results were used to model both groups’ perceptual strategies.Normal-hearing listeners outperformed cochlear-implant users in emotion recognition, even when presented with cochlear-implant simulated stimuli. Unlike cochlear-implant users, however, normal-hearing listeners recognized one particular actor’s emotionsworse than the other actors’. The groups thus behaved differently when presented with similar input, supporting the different strategies hypothesis. Considering the respective speaker’s deviating pronunciation regarding mean pitch and pitch range, it appears that for normal-hearing listeners, mean pitch is a more salient cue than pitch range, whereas cochlear-implant users are biased towards pitch range cues.

M3 - Abstract

SP - 28

ER -

Gilbers S, Fuller C, Broersma M, Goudbeek MB, Free R, Başkent D. Perception of Acoustic Emotion Cues in Normal Hearing Listeners and Cochlear Implant Users. 2014. Abstract from Bias in Auditory Perception Conference, Aarhus, Denmark, Denmark.