Perspective-Taking in Referential Communication: Does Stimulated Attention to Addressee's Perspective Influence Speakers' Reference Production?

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

Abstract

We investigated whether speakers' referential communication benefits from an explicit focus on addressees' perspective. Dyads took part in a referential communication game and were allocated to one of three experimental settings. Each of these settings elicited a different perspective mindset (none, self-focus, other-focus). In the two perspective settings, speakers were explicitly instructed to regard their addressee's (other-focus) or their own (self-focus) perspective before construing their referential message. Results indicated that eliciting speakers' self-versus other-focus did not influence their reference production. We did find that speakers with an elicited egocentric perspective reported a higher perspective-taking tendency than speakers in the other two settings. This tendency correlated with actual referring behavior during the game, indicating that speakers who reported a high perspective-taking tendency were less likely to make egocentric errors such as leaking information privileged to speakers themselves. These findings are explained using the objective self-awareness theory.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 39th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society
EditorsG. Gunzelmann, A. Howes, T. Tenbrink, E. J. Davelaar
Place of PublicationAustin, TX
PublisherCognitive Science Society
Pages1866-1871
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)9780991196760
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2017
Eventcogsci 2017 - London, United Kingdom
Duration: 26 Jul 201729 Jul 2017

Conference

Conferencecogsci 2017
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period26/07/1729/07/17

Fingerprint

communication
self awareness
dyad

Keywords

  • Perspective-taking
  • referential communication
  • egocentricity bias
  • privileged information

Cite this

Damen, D., van der Wijst, P., van Amelsvoort, M., & Krahmer, E. (2017). Perspective-Taking in Referential Communication: Does Stimulated Attention to Addressee's Perspective Influence Speakers' Reference Production? In G. Gunzelmann, A. Howes, T. Tenbrink, & E. J. Davelaar (Eds.), Proceedings of the 39th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 1866-1871). Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.
Damen, Debby ; van der Wijst, Per ; van Amelsvoort, Marije ; Krahmer, Emiel. / Perspective-Taking in Referential Communication: Does Stimulated Attention to Addressee's Perspective Influence Speakers' Reference Production?. Proceedings of the 39th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. editor / G. Gunzelmann ; A. Howes ; T. Tenbrink ; E. J. Davelaar. Austin, TX : Cognitive Science Society, 2017. pp. 1866-1871
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abstract = "We investigated whether speakers' referential communication benefits from an explicit focus on addressees' perspective. Dyads took part in a referential communication game and were allocated to one of three experimental settings. Each of these settings elicited a different perspective mindset (none, self-focus, other-focus). In the two perspective settings, speakers were explicitly instructed to regard their addressee's (other-focus) or their own (self-focus) perspective before construing their referential message. Results indicated that eliciting speakers' self-versus other-focus did not influence their reference production. We did find that speakers with an elicited egocentric perspective reported a higher perspective-taking tendency than speakers in the other two settings. This tendency correlated with actual referring behavior during the game, indicating that speakers who reported a high perspective-taking tendency were less likely to make egocentric errors such as leaking information privileged to speakers themselves. These findings are explained using the objective self-awareness theory.",
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Damen, D, van der Wijst, P, van Amelsvoort, M & Krahmer, E 2017, Perspective-Taking in Referential Communication: Does Stimulated Attention to Addressee's Perspective Influence Speakers' Reference Production? in G Gunzelmann, A Howes, T Tenbrink & EJ Davelaar (eds), Proceedings of the 39th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society, Austin, TX, pp. 1866-1871, cogsci 2017, London, United Kingdom, 26/07/17.

Perspective-Taking in Referential Communication: Does Stimulated Attention to Addressee's Perspective Influence Speakers' Reference Production? / Damen, Debby; van der Wijst, Per; van Amelsvoort, Marije; Krahmer, Emiel.

Proceedings of the 39th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. ed. / G. Gunzelmann; A. Howes; T. Tenbrink; E. J. Davelaar. Austin, TX : Cognitive Science Society, 2017. p. 1866-1871.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

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Damen D, van der Wijst P, van Amelsvoort M, Krahmer E. Perspective-Taking in Referential Communication: Does Stimulated Attention to Addressee's Perspective Influence Speakers' Reference Production? In Gunzelmann G, Howes A, Tenbrink T, Davelaar EJ, editors, Proceedings of the 39th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society. 2017. p. 1866-1871