Perspective-Taking in Referential Communication: Does Stimulated Attention to Addressees’ Perspective Influence Speakers’ Reference Production?

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In two experiments, we investigated whether speakers’ referential communication benefits from an explicit focus on addressees’ perspective. Dyads took part in a referential communication game and were allocated to one of three experimental settings. Each of these settings elicited a different perspective mind-set (baseline, self-focus, other-focus). In the two perspective settings, speakers were explicitly instructed to regard their addressees’ (other-focus) or their own (self focus) perspective before construing their referential message.
Results evidenced speakers’ egocentricity bias. Even though speakers were explicitly aware of addressees’ informational need, speakers still referred to information not known to their addressee. Speakers’ self-reported perspective-taking behavior correlated with their actual reference behavior. Those who reported to have regarded addressees’ perspective were also less likely to have leaked information about their own knowledge and attentional state. Findings are discussed in light of speakers’ egocentricity bias and the role of speaker-addressee collaboration in language production
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)257-288
JournalJournal of Psycholinguistic Research
Volume48
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • PERSPECTIVE-TAKING
  • referential communication
  • egocentricity bias
  • privileged information

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