Perspective-Taking in Social Interaction

The Influence of Speakers' Attention to Addressees' Different Perspective on Speakers' Audience Design

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

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Abstract

Previous research shows that speakers often fail to regard their addressee's perspective during conversation. This study investigated whether speakers' referential communication benefits from an explicitly stimulated attention to addressees' perspective. This aim was experimentally investigated among student dyads taking part in a referential communication game in which they were randomly assigned the role of the speaker or addressee. Dyads were allocated to one of three experimental settings, each eliciting a different perspective mindset (none, self-focus, other-focus). In the two perspective settings, speakers were explicitly instructed to regard their addressee's (other-focus) or their own (self-focus) perspective before construing their referential message. Results indicated that eliciting speakers' self-versus other-awareness did not influence speakers' audience design. We did find a relationship between speakers' self-reported perspective-taking tendency and their actual referential behavior. Self-focused speakers reported a higher perspective-taking tendency than other-focused speakers. Findings have been explained using the objective self-awareness theory.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication67th Annual ICA Conference
Publication statusPublished - May 2017
EventAnnual Conference of the International Communication Association 2017: Intervention: Communication Research and Practice - Hilton Bayfront San Diego, San Diego, United States
Duration: 25 May 201729 May 2017
Conference number: 67
http://www.icahdq.org/general/custom.asp?page=Conference
http://www.icahdq.org/event/SanDiegoConference

Conference

ConferenceAnnual Conference of the International Communication Association 2017
Abbreviated titleICA 2017
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego
Period25/05/1729/05/17
Internet address

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interaction
dyad
communication
self awareness
conversation
student

Keywords

  • Perspective-taking
  • referential communication
  • egocentricity bias
  • experimental research

Cite this

@inproceedings{cad5c1bb4fb848dc9851f58362f42bdc,
title = "Perspective-Taking in Social Interaction: The Influence of Speakers' Attention to Addressees' Different Perspective on Speakers' Audience Design",
abstract = "Previous research shows that speakers often fail to regard their addressee's perspective during conversation. This study investigated whether speakers' referential communication benefits from an explicitly stimulated attention to addressees' perspective. This aim was experimentally investigated among student dyads taking part in a referential communication game in which they were randomly assigned the role of the speaker or addressee. Dyads were allocated to one of three experimental settings, each eliciting a different perspective mindset (none, self-focus, other-focus). In the two perspective settings, speakers were explicitly instructed to regard their addressee's (other-focus) or their own (self-focus) perspective before construing their referential message. Results indicated that eliciting speakers' self-versus other-awareness did not influence speakers' audience design. We did find a relationship between speakers' self-reported perspective-taking tendency and their actual referential behavior. Self-focused speakers reported a higher perspective-taking tendency than other-focused speakers. Findings have been explained using the objective self-awareness theory.",
keywords = "Perspective-taking, referential communication, egocentricity bias, experimental research",
author = "Debby Damen and {van der Wijst}, Per and {van Amelsvoort}, Marije and Emiel Krahmer",
year = "2017",
month = "5",
language = "English",
booktitle = "67th Annual ICA Conference",

}

Damen, D, van der Wijst, P, van Amelsvoort, M & Krahmer, E 2017, Perspective-Taking in Social Interaction: The Influence of Speakers' Attention to Addressees' Different Perspective on Speakers' Audience Design. in 67th Annual ICA Conference. Annual Conference of the International Communication Association 2017, San Diego, United States, 25/05/17.

Perspective-Taking in Social Interaction : The Influence of Speakers' Attention to Addressees' Different Perspective on Speakers' Audience Design. / Damen, Debby; van der Wijst, Per; van Amelsvoort, Marije; Krahmer, Emiel.

67th Annual ICA Conference. 2017.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

TY - GEN

T1 - Perspective-Taking in Social Interaction

T2 - The Influence of Speakers' Attention to Addressees' Different Perspective on Speakers' Audience Design

AU - Damen, Debby

AU - van der Wijst, Per

AU - van Amelsvoort, Marije

AU - Krahmer, Emiel

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N2 - Previous research shows that speakers often fail to regard their addressee's perspective during conversation. This study investigated whether speakers' referential communication benefits from an explicitly stimulated attention to addressees' perspective. This aim was experimentally investigated among student dyads taking part in a referential communication game in which they were randomly assigned the role of the speaker or addressee. Dyads were allocated to one of three experimental settings, each eliciting a different perspective mindset (none, self-focus, other-focus). In the two perspective settings, speakers were explicitly instructed to regard their addressee's (other-focus) or their own (self-focus) perspective before construing their referential message. Results indicated that eliciting speakers' self-versus other-awareness did not influence speakers' audience design. We did find a relationship between speakers' self-reported perspective-taking tendency and their actual referential behavior. Self-focused speakers reported a higher perspective-taking tendency than other-focused speakers. Findings have been explained using the objective self-awareness theory.

AB - Previous research shows that speakers often fail to regard their addressee's perspective during conversation. This study investigated whether speakers' referential communication benefits from an explicitly stimulated attention to addressees' perspective. This aim was experimentally investigated among student dyads taking part in a referential communication game in which they were randomly assigned the role of the speaker or addressee. Dyads were allocated to one of three experimental settings, each eliciting a different perspective mindset (none, self-focus, other-focus). In the two perspective settings, speakers were explicitly instructed to regard their addressee's (other-focus) or their own (self-focus) perspective before construing their referential message. Results indicated that eliciting speakers' self-versus other-awareness did not influence speakers' audience design. We did find a relationship between speakers' self-reported perspective-taking tendency and their actual referential behavior. Self-focused speakers reported a higher perspective-taking tendency than other-focused speakers. Findings have been explained using the objective self-awareness theory.

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