Pilot Error? Managerial decision biases as explanation for disruptions in aircraft development

Henk Akkermans, K.E. van Oorschot

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Although concurrency between project development stages is an effective approach to speeding up project progress, previous research recommends concurrent engineer- ing primarily for less complex, incremental projects. As such, in complex radical aircraft development projects, managers opt for less concurrency; however, by using system dynamics modeling, this study shows that less concurrency can contribute to overall project delays, rather than preventing them. The time lost by rework due to early starts of project stages is more than compensated by the time gained by early feedback and faster learning, with positive effects on project completion and subsequent sales.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)79-102
JournalProject Management Journal
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Mar 2016

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Concurrent engineering
Sales
Dynamical systems
Managers
Aircraft
Feedback
Concurrency
Managerial decisions
Disruption
Decision bias

Cite this

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Pilot Error? Managerial decision biases as explanation for disruptions in aircraft development. / Akkermans, Henk; van Oorschot, K.E.

In: Project Management Journal, Vol. 47, No. 2, 22.03.2016, p. 79-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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