Positive affect dimensions and their association with inflammatory biomarkers in patients with chronic heart failure

C.J. Brouwers, P.M.C. Mommersteeg, I. Nyklicek, A.J.M. Pelle, B.L.W.J.J.M. Westerhuis, B.M. Szabó, J. Denollet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Background
In cardiac patients positive affect has found to be associated with improved clinical outcomes, with reduced inflammation being one of the potential mechanisms responsible.
Methods
Positive affect was assessed using The Global Mood Scale (GMS), Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in patient with chronic heart failure (N = 210; 67 ± 9 years, 79% men). Markers of inflammation (TNFα, sTNFr1, sTNFr2, IL-6 and CRP) were measured and averaged at three consecutive time points.
Results
The positive affect dimensions of the GMS and PANAS were significantly associated with lower averaged levels of sTNFr2, TNFα and IL-6 (p < .1), even after adjustment for clinical and lifestyle confounders. Positive affect of the HADS was significantly associated with lower averaged levels of hsCRP (p < .1), but was no longer significant after correction for lifestyle confounders and depressive symptoms.
Conclusion
Positive affect is associated with reduced inflammation in patients with heart failure.
Highlights
► Positive affect constructs (GMS, HADS, PANAS) measure different dimension of positive affect. 
► The association between positive affect and inflammatory biomarkers depends on the construct used. 
► Positive affect is associated with lower averaged levels of sTNFr2, TNFα, IL-6 and hsCRP. 
► Positive affect may thereby induce a health benefit in heart failure patients. 
► One should be cautious when comparing study outcomes which used different types of positive affect.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)220-226
JournalBiological Psychology
Volume92
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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title = "Positive affect dimensions and their association with inflammatory biomarkers in patients with chronic heart failure",
abstract = "BackgroundIn cardiac patients positive affect has found to be associated with improved clinical outcomes, with reduced inflammation being one of the potential mechanisms responsible.MethodsPositive affect was assessed using The Global Mood Scale (GMS), Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in patient with chronic heart failure (N = 210; 67 ± 9 years, 79{\%} men). Markers of inflammation (TNFα, sTNFr1, sTNFr2, IL-6 and CRP) were measured and averaged at three consecutive time points.ResultsThe positive affect dimensions of the GMS and PANAS were significantly associated with lower averaged levels of sTNFr2, TNFα and IL-6 (p < .1), even after adjustment for clinical and lifestyle confounders. Positive affect of the HADS was significantly associated with lower averaged levels of hsCRP (p < .1), but was no longer significant after correction for lifestyle confounders and depressive symptoms.ConclusionPositive affect is associated with reduced inflammation in patients with heart failure.Highlights► Positive affect constructs (GMS, HADS, PANAS) measure different dimension of positive affect. ► The association between positive affect and inflammatory biomarkers depends on the construct used. ► Positive affect is associated with lower averaged levels of sTNFr2, TNFα, IL-6 and hsCRP. ► Positive affect may thereby induce a health benefit in heart failure patients. ► One should be cautious when comparing study outcomes which used different types of positive affect.",
author = "C.J. Brouwers and P.M.C. Mommersteeg and I. Nyklicek and A.J.M. Pelle and B.L.W.J.J.M. Westerhuis and B.M. Szab{\'o} and J. Denollet",
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language = "English",
volume = "92",
pages = "220--226",
journal = "Biological Psychology",
issn = "0301-0511",
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Positive affect dimensions and their association with inflammatory biomarkers in patients with chronic heart failure. / Brouwers, C.J.; Mommersteeg, P.M.C.; Nyklicek, I.; Pelle, A.J.M.; Westerhuis, B.L.W.J.J.M.; Szabó, B.M.; Denollet, J.

In: Biological Psychology, Vol. 92, No. 2, 2013, p. 220-226.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Positive affect dimensions and their association with inflammatory biomarkers in patients with chronic heart failure

AU - Brouwers, C.J.

AU - Mommersteeg, P.M.C.

AU - Nyklicek, I.

AU - Pelle, A.J.M.

AU - Westerhuis, B.L.W.J.J.M.

AU - Szabó, B.M.

AU - Denollet, J.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - BackgroundIn cardiac patients positive affect has found to be associated with improved clinical outcomes, with reduced inflammation being one of the potential mechanisms responsible.MethodsPositive affect was assessed using The Global Mood Scale (GMS), Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in patient with chronic heart failure (N = 210; 67 ± 9 years, 79% men). Markers of inflammation (TNFα, sTNFr1, sTNFr2, IL-6 and CRP) were measured and averaged at three consecutive time points.ResultsThe positive affect dimensions of the GMS and PANAS were significantly associated with lower averaged levels of sTNFr2, TNFα and IL-6 (p < .1), even after adjustment for clinical and lifestyle confounders. Positive affect of the HADS was significantly associated with lower averaged levels of hsCRP (p < .1), but was no longer significant after correction for lifestyle confounders and depressive symptoms.ConclusionPositive affect is associated with reduced inflammation in patients with heart failure.Highlights► Positive affect constructs (GMS, HADS, PANAS) measure different dimension of positive affect. ► The association between positive affect and inflammatory biomarkers depends on the construct used. ► Positive affect is associated with lower averaged levels of sTNFr2, TNFα, IL-6 and hsCRP. ► Positive affect may thereby induce a health benefit in heart failure patients. ► One should be cautious when comparing study outcomes which used different types of positive affect.

AB - BackgroundIn cardiac patients positive affect has found to be associated with improved clinical outcomes, with reduced inflammation being one of the potential mechanisms responsible.MethodsPositive affect was assessed using The Global Mood Scale (GMS), Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in patient with chronic heart failure (N = 210; 67 ± 9 years, 79% men). Markers of inflammation (TNFα, sTNFr1, sTNFr2, IL-6 and CRP) were measured and averaged at three consecutive time points.ResultsThe positive affect dimensions of the GMS and PANAS were significantly associated with lower averaged levels of sTNFr2, TNFα and IL-6 (p < .1), even after adjustment for clinical and lifestyle confounders. Positive affect of the HADS was significantly associated with lower averaged levels of hsCRP (p < .1), but was no longer significant after correction for lifestyle confounders and depressive symptoms.ConclusionPositive affect is associated with reduced inflammation in patients with heart failure.Highlights► Positive affect constructs (GMS, HADS, PANAS) measure different dimension of positive affect. ► The association between positive affect and inflammatory biomarkers depends on the construct used. ► Positive affect is associated with lower averaged levels of sTNFr2, TNFα, IL-6 and hsCRP. ► Positive affect may thereby induce a health benefit in heart failure patients. ► One should be cautious when comparing study outcomes which used different types of positive affect.

U2 - 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2012.10.002

DO - 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2012.10.002

M3 - Article

VL - 92

SP - 220

EP - 226

JO - Biological Psychology

JF - Biological Psychology

SN - 0301-0511

IS - 2

ER -