Preferring habitual behavior following stress

Is the proof of the pudding in the eating?

T. Smeets, Cwem Quaedflieg

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting AbstractOther research output

Abstract

Background:
Our psychophysiological stress responses generally serve adaptive purposes such as promoting the use of simple habits over complex goal-directed behavior. Nevertheless, such a preference for habits under stress may, in vulnerable individuals, constitute a risk factor for psychopathology. For example, stress often precedes emotional eating and binge eating episodes, and is reported by people with a substance addiction as a primary reason for relapsing.

Methods:
Here we report on the development of a new paradigm that aims to distinguish goal-directed from habitual behavior utilizing actual eating during reward learning and as outcome devaluation procedure. Study 1 experimentally tests three versions of the paradigm (n = 20 per task version); Study 2 examines whether exposure to an acute stressor results in a preference for habitual behavior relative to a non-stress control group (n = 20 per group), and whether this is linked to glucocorticoid and adrenergic stress responses.

Results and conclusions:
Results from both studies and their implications for an empirically supported method of measuring goal-directed versus habitual behavior in future stress studies will be discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-47
JournalPsychoneuroendocrinology
Volume71
Issue numberSuppl.
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Habits
Adrenergic Agents
Glucocorticoids

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title = "Preferring habitual behavior following stress: Is the proof of the pudding in the eating?",
abstract = "Background: Our psychophysiological stress responses generally serve adaptive purposes such as promoting the use of simple habits over complex goal-directed behavior. Nevertheless, such a preference for habits under stress may, in vulnerable individuals, constitute a risk factor for psychopathology. For example, stress often precedes emotional eating and binge eating episodes, and is reported by people with a substance addiction as a primary reason for relapsing.Methods: Here we report on the development of a new paradigm that aims to distinguish goal-directed from habitual behavior utilizing actual eating during reward learning and as outcome devaluation procedure. Study 1 experimentally tests three versions of the paradigm (n = 20 per task version); Study 2 examines whether exposure to an acute stressor results in a preference for habitual behavior relative to a non-stress control group (n = 20 per group), and whether this is linked to glucocorticoid and adrenergic stress responses.Results and conclusions: Results from both studies and their implications for an empirically supported method of measuring goal-directed versus habitual behavior in future stress studies will be discussed.",
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Preferring habitual behavior following stress : Is the proof of the pudding in the eating? / Smeets, T.; Quaedflieg, Cwem.

In: Psychoneuroendocrinology, Vol. 71, No. Suppl., 2016, p. 47-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting AbstractOther research output

TY - JOUR

T1 - Preferring habitual behavior following stress

T2 - Is the proof of the pudding in the eating?

AU - Smeets, T.

AU - Quaedflieg, Cwem

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Background: Our psychophysiological stress responses generally serve adaptive purposes such as promoting the use of simple habits over complex goal-directed behavior. Nevertheless, such a preference for habits under stress may, in vulnerable individuals, constitute a risk factor for psychopathology. For example, stress often precedes emotional eating and binge eating episodes, and is reported by people with a substance addiction as a primary reason for relapsing.Methods: Here we report on the development of a new paradigm that aims to distinguish goal-directed from habitual behavior utilizing actual eating during reward learning and as outcome devaluation procedure. Study 1 experimentally tests three versions of the paradigm (n = 20 per task version); Study 2 examines whether exposure to an acute stressor results in a preference for habitual behavior relative to a non-stress control group (n = 20 per group), and whether this is linked to glucocorticoid and adrenergic stress responses.Results and conclusions: Results from both studies and their implications for an empirically supported method of measuring goal-directed versus habitual behavior in future stress studies will be discussed.

AB - Background: Our psychophysiological stress responses generally serve adaptive purposes such as promoting the use of simple habits over complex goal-directed behavior. Nevertheless, such a preference for habits under stress may, in vulnerable individuals, constitute a risk factor for psychopathology. For example, stress often precedes emotional eating and binge eating episodes, and is reported by people with a substance addiction as a primary reason for relapsing.Methods: Here we report on the development of a new paradigm that aims to distinguish goal-directed from habitual behavior utilizing actual eating during reward learning and as outcome devaluation procedure. Study 1 experimentally tests three versions of the paradigm (n = 20 per task version); Study 2 examines whether exposure to an acute stressor results in a preference for habitual behavior relative to a non-stress control group (n = 20 per group), and whether this is linked to glucocorticoid and adrenergic stress responses.Results and conclusions: Results from both studies and their implications for an empirically supported method of measuring goal-directed versus habitual behavior in future stress studies will be discussed.

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DO - 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2016.07.124

M3 - Meeting Abstract

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JO - Psychoneuroendocrinology

JF - Psychoneuroendocrinology

SN - 0306-4530

IS - Suppl.

ER -