Public Places, Private Lives: Balancing Privacy and Freedom of Expression in the United Kingdom

Bryce Newell

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Case law from the United Kingdom suggests that the incorporation of the European Convention on Human Rights into domestic law has spurred the growth of domestic privacy law at the expense of the rights of the press to free expression and, in line with prior theory, has also granted greater political authority to courts and judges tasked with balancing privacy and expression in domestic legal disputes. These shifts in privacy case law may also suggest that incorporation has increased opportunities for participatory democratic governance by the citizenry, at least through enhanced access to judicial remedies for privacy violations and the enforcement of Convention rights, as interpreted by the European Court of Human Rights.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the American Society for Information Science and Technology
PublisherWiley
Number of pages10
Volume51
Edition1
ISBN (Electronic)2373-9231
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

privacy law
case law
privacy
ECHR
remedies
human rights
governance
Law

Keywords

  • privacy
  • free speech
  • expression
  • law
  • courts
  • European court of human rights
  • European Convention on Human Rights
  • United kingdom
  • united states

Cite this

Newell, B. (2014). Public Places, Private Lives: Balancing Privacy and Freedom of Expression in the United Kingdom. In Proceedings of the American Society for Information Science and Technology (1 ed., Vol. 51). Wiley.
Newell, Bryce. / Public Places, Private Lives: Balancing Privacy and Freedom of Expression in the United Kingdom. Proceedings of the American Society for Information Science and Technology. Vol. 51 1. ed. Wiley, 2014.
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Newell, B 2014, Public Places, Private Lives: Balancing Privacy and Freedom of Expression in the United Kingdom. in Proceedings of the American Society for Information Science and Technology. 1 edn, vol. 51, Wiley.

Public Places, Private Lives: Balancing Privacy and Freedom of Expression in the United Kingdom. / Newell, Bryce.

Proceedings of the American Society for Information Science and Technology. Vol. 51 1. ed. Wiley, 2014.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

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Newell B. Public Places, Private Lives: Balancing Privacy and Freedom of Expression in the United Kingdom. In Proceedings of the American Society for Information Science and Technology. 1 ed. Vol. 51. Wiley. 2014