Publicly announced access recommendations and consumers’ service time choices with uncertain congestion

Q. Han, B.G.C. Dellaert, W. Dellaert, W.F. van Raaij, H.J.P. Timmermans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

This article investigates consumers' anticipation of other consumers' service time choices in capacity-constrained services and how this is affected by publicly announced access recommendations. Empirical results from an experiment with simulated congestion experiences show that the impact of consumers' anticipation of other consumers' service time choices is lower for first-time than for the repeated encounters. Despite consumers greater information need in first-time encounters, we predict that the impact of publicly announced access recommendations is lower in first-time than in repeated service encounters. The reason is that consumers have not yet learned how to take into account the impact of recommendations on other consumers' choices. However, we hypothesize that consumers do benefit from recommendations in that recommendations allow them to better anticipate other consumers' choices and are also able to learn about others' choices sooner than in case no recommendations are provided.
Keywords: Services marketing, Service time choice, Congestion, Consumer decision making
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-10
JournalJournal of Choice Modelling
Volume10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Congestion
Marketing
Recommendations
Decision making
Anticipation
Experiments
Consumer services
Decision Making
Predict
Experiment
Consumer choice

Cite this

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title = "Publicly announced access recommendations and consumers’ service time choices with uncertain congestion",
abstract = "This article investigates consumers' anticipation of other consumers' service time choices in capacity-constrained services and how this is affected by publicly announced access recommendations. Empirical results from an experiment with simulated congestion experiences show that the impact of consumers' anticipation of other consumers' service time choices is lower for first-time than for the repeated encounters. Despite consumers greater information need in first-time encounters, we predict that the impact of publicly announced access recommendations is lower in first-time than in repeated service encounters. The reason is that consumers have not yet learned how to take into account the impact of recommendations on other consumers' choices. However, we hypothesize that consumers do benefit from recommendations in that recommendations allow them to better anticipate other consumers' choices and are also able to learn about others' choices sooner than in case no recommendations are provided.Keywords: Services marketing, Service time choice, Congestion, Consumer decision making",
author = "Q. Han and B.G.C. Dellaert and W. Dellaert and {van Raaij}, W.F. and H.J.P. Timmermans",
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Publicly announced access recommendations and consumers’ service time choices with uncertain congestion. / Han, Q.; Dellaert, B.G.C.; Dellaert, W.; van Raaij, W.F.; Timmermans, H.J.P.

In: Journal of Choice Modelling, Vol. 10, 2014, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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T1 - Publicly announced access recommendations and consumers’ service time choices with uncertain congestion

AU - Han, Q.

AU - Dellaert, B.G.C.

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AU - van Raaij, W.F.

AU - Timmermans, H.J.P.

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AB - This article investigates consumers' anticipation of other consumers' service time choices in capacity-constrained services and how this is affected by publicly announced access recommendations. Empirical results from an experiment with simulated congestion experiences show that the impact of consumers' anticipation of other consumers' service time choices is lower for first-time than for the repeated encounters. Despite consumers greater information need in first-time encounters, we predict that the impact of publicly announced access recommendations is lower in first-time than in repeated service encounters. The reason is that consumers have not yet learned how to take into account the impact of recommendations on other consumers' choices. However, we hypothesize that consumers do benefit from recommendations in that recommendations allow them to better anticipate other consumers' choices and are also able to learn about others' choices sooner than in case no recommendations are provided.Keywords: Services marketing, Service time choice, Congestion, Consumer decision making

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