Reciprocal associations between adolescent girls' chronic interpersonal stress and nonsuicidal self-injury: A multi-wave prospective investigation

Adam Bryant Miller, Katherine P. Linthicum, Sarah W. Helms, Matteo Giletta, Karen D. Rudolph, Paul D. Hastings, Matthew K. Nock, Mitchell J. Prinstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: 

Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is associated with increased risk of suicide attempts. Theories of NSSI assert interpersonal stress as a common risk factor for, and perhaps consequence of, NSSI. Prior research has not examined reciprocal associations between chronic interpersonal stress and NSSI. This study used a multiwave, prospective design to address this gap in a sample of adolescent girls, a group with elevated risk for both chronic interpersonal stress and NSSI. Pubertal development was examined as a moderator of the reciprocal associations.

Methods: 

Adolescent girls (N = 220; ages 12-16, M age = 14.69 years) at heightened risk for NSSI completed a baseline assessment and follow-up assessments over 18 months, divided into two 9-month epochs (Time 1 and 2). Pubertal development was assessed via self- and parent-report. Chronic interpersonal stress was assessed using a semistructured interview at the end of each time period. NSSI was measured using a semi structured clinical interview every 3 months within both time periods to enhance accurate reporting.

Results: 

Path models revealed that chronic romantic stress during Time 1, but not peer or parent child stress, predicted NSSI during Time 2 among girls with more advanced pubertal development. Moreover, NSSI during Time 1 predicted higher levels of chronic romantic and parent child stress during Time 2.

Conclusions: 

Results revealed a reciprocal relationship between chronic romantic stress and engagement in NSSI. Further, this association may be best understood in the context of pubertal development. 2018 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)694-700
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume63
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2018

Keywords

  • NSSI
  • Self-injury
  • Romantic stress
  • Adolescent dating
  • Pubertal development
  • ROMANTIC RELATIONSHIPS
  • LIFE EVENTS
  • DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS
  • YOUTH DEPRESSION
  • SEX-DIFFERENCES
  • METAANALYSIS
  • BEHAVIOR
  • SAMPLE
  • RISK
  • VICTIMIZATION

Cite this

Miller, Adam Bryant ; Linthicum, Katherine P. ; Helms, Sarah W. ; Giletta, Matteo ; Rudolph, Karen D. ; Hastings, Paul D. ; Nock, Matthew K. ; Prinstein, Mitchell J. / Reciprocal associations between adolescent girls' chronic interpersonal stress and nonsuicidal self-injury : A multi-wave prospective investigation. In: Journal of Adolescent Health. 2018 ; Vol. 63, No. 6. pp. 694-700.
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title = "Reciprocal associations between adolescent girls' chronic interpersonal stress and nonsuicidal self-injury: A multi-wave prospective investigation",
abstract = "Purpose: Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is associated with increased risk of suicide attempts. Theories of NSSI assert interpersonal stress as a common risk factor for, and perhaps consequence of, NSSI. Prior research has not examined reciprocal associations between chronic interpersonal stress and NSSI. This study used a multiwave, prospective design to address this gap in a sample of adolescent girls, a group with elevated risk for both chronic interpersonal stress and NSSI. Pubertal development was examined as a moderator of the reciprocal associations.Methods: Adolescent girls (N = 220; ages 12-16, M age = 14.69 years) at heightened risk for NSSI completed a baseline assessment and follow-up assessments over 18 months, divided into two 9-month epochs (Time 1 and 2). Pubertal development was assessed via self- and parent-report. Chronic interpersonal stress was assessed using a semistructured interview at the end of each time period. NSSI was measured using a semi structured clinical interview every 3 months within both time periods to enhance accurate reporting.Results: Path models revealed that chronic romantic stress during Time 1, but not peer or parent child stress, predicted NSSI during Time 2 among girls with more advanced pubertal development. Moreover, NSSI during Time 1 predicted higher levels of chronic romantic and parent child stress during Time 2.Conclusions: Results revealed a reciprocal relationship between chronic romantic stress and engagement in NSSI. Further, this association may be best understood in the context of pubertal development. 2018 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.",
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author = "Miller, {Adam Bryant} and Linthicum, {Katherine P.} and Helms, {Sarah W.} and Matteo Giletta and Rudolph, {Karen D.} and Hastings, {Paul D.} and Nock, {Matthew K.} and Prinstein, {Mitchell J.}",
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Reciprocal associations between adolescent girls' chronic interpersonal stress and nonsuicidal self-injury : A multi-wave prospective investigation. / Miller, Adam Bryant; Linthicum, Katherine P.; Helms, Sarah W.; Giletta, Matteo; Rudolph, Karen D.; Hastings, Paul D.; Nock, Matthew K.; Prinstein, Mitchell J.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 63, No. 6, 12.2018, p. 694-700.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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T2 - A multi-wave prospective investigation

AU - Miller, Adam Bryant

AU - Linthicum, Katherine P.

AU - Helms, Sarah W.

AU - Giletta, Matteo

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AU - Hastings, Paul D.

AU - Nock, Matthew K.

AU - Prinstein, Mitchell J.

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N2 - Purpose: Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is associated with increased risk of suicide attempts. Theories of NSSI assert interpersonal stress as a common risk factor for, and perhaps consequence of, NSSI. Prior research has not examined reciprocal associations between chronic interpersonal stress and NSSI. This study used a multiwave, prospective design to address this gap in a sample of adolescent girls, a group with elevated risk for both chronic interpersonal stress and NSSI. Pubertal development was examined as a moderator of the reciprocal associations.Methods: Adolescent girls (N = 220; ages 12-16, M age = 14.69 years) at heightened risk for NSSI completed a baseline assessment and follow-up assessments over 18 months, divided into two 9-month epochs (Time 1 and 2). Pubertal development was assessed via self- and parent-report. Chronic interpersonal stress was assessed using a semistructured interview at the end of each time period. NSSI was measured using a semi structured clinical interview every 3 months within both time periods to enhance accurate reporting.Results: Path models revealed that chronic romantic stress during Time 1, but not peer or parent child stress, predicted NSSI during Time 2 among girls with more advanced pubertal development. Moreover, NSSI during Time 1 predicted higher levels of chronic romantic and parent child stress during Time 2.Conclusions: Results revealed a reciprocal relationship between chronic romantic stress and engagement in NSSI. Further, this association may be best understood in the context of pubertal development. 2018 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.

AB - Purpose: Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is associated with increased risk of suicide attempts. Theories of NSSI assert interpersonal stress as a common risk factor for, and perhaps consequence of, NSSI. Prior research has not examined reciprocal associations between chronic interpersonal stress and NSSI. This study used a multiwave, prospective design to address this gap in a sample of adolescent girls, a group with elevated risk for both chronic interpersonal stress and NSSI. Pubertal development was examined as a moderator of the reciprocal associations.Methods: Adolescent girls (N = 220; ages 12-16, M age = 14.69 years) at heightened risk for NSSI completed a baseline assessment and follow-up assessments over 18 months, divided into two 9-month epochs (Time 1 and 2). Pubertal development was assessed via self- and parent-report. Chronic interpersonal stress was assessed using a semistructured interview at the end of each time period. NSSI was measured using a semi structured clinical interview every 3 months within both time periods to enhance accurate reporting.Results: Path models revealed that chronic romantic stress during Time 1, but not peer or parent child stress, predicted NSSI during Time 2 among girls with more advanced pubertal development. Moreover, NSSI during Time 1 predicted higher levels of chronic romantic and parent child stress during Time 2.Conclusions: Results revealed a reciprocal relationship between chronic romantic stress and engagement in NSSI. Further, this association may be best understood in the context of pubertal development. 2018 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.

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KW - DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS

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KW - METAANALYSIS

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KW - SAMPLE

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