Residential relocation by older adults in response to incident cardiovascular health events: A case-crossover analysis

G. Lovasi, J.M. Richardson, C.J. Rodriguez, W.J. Kop, A. Ahmed, A.F. Brown, H. Greenlee, D.S. Siscovick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
54 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objective.
We use a case-crossover analysis to explore the association between incident cardiovascular events and residential relocation to a new home address. Methods.
We conducted an ambidirectional case-crossover analysis to explore the association between incident cardiovascular events and residential relocation to a new address using data from the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS), a community-based prospective cohort study of 5,888 older adults from four U.S. sites beginning in 1989. Relocation was assessed twice a year during follow-up. Event occurrences were classified as present or absent for the period preceding the first reported move, as compared with an equal length of time immediately prior to and following this period.
Results.
Older adults (65+) that experience incident cardiovascular disease had an increased probability of reporting a change of residence during the following year (OR 1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2–2.1). Clinical conditions associated with relocation included stroke (OR: 2.0, 95% CI: 1.2–3.3), angina (OR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.0–2.6), and congestive heart failure (OR: 1.5, 95% CI: 1.0–2.1). Conclusions.
Major incident cardiovascular disease may increase the probability of residential relocation in older adults. Case-crossover analyses represent an opportunity to investigate triggering events, but finer temporal resolution would be crucial for future research on residential relocations.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Environmental and Public Health
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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