Same moon rising: On the non-existence of a unique Japanese model for supply network dynamics

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Abstract

The industrial organisation of Japanese industry in keiretsu-type of supply networks has long been considered a phenomenon attributable to cultural factors, as something uniquely “Japanese”. This paper challenges this view, both theoretically and empirically, Theoretically, the paper draws on the field of operations management, first by making the comparison with “lean production” and secondly by providing alternative explanations for the specific structure of Japanese supply networks such as modularity of product architecture, industry clockspeed and industry maturity. Empirically, the paper provides illustrative case examples of very different supply network structures in different Japanese industries, varying from clockspeed aerospace via medium to high clockspeed electronics and telecom, which show how industry settings, and not culture, determine supply network structure and dynamics.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)101-116
JournalJapan Studies Association Journal
Volume8
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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Industry
Supply network
Network dynamics
Network structure
Maturity
Modularity
Keiretsu
Cultural factors
Industrial organization
Operations management
Lean production
Telecom
Aerospace
Product architecture

Cite this

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title = "Same moon rising: On the non-existence of a unique Japanese model for supply network dynamics",
abstract = "The industrial organisation of Japanese industry in keiretsu-type of supply networks has long been considered a phenomenon attributable to cultural factors, as something uniquely “Japanese”. This paper challenges this view, both theoretically and empirically, Theoretically, the paper draws on the field of operations management, first by making the comparison with “lean production” and secondly by providing alternative explanations for the specific structure of Japanese supply networks such as modularity of product architecture, industry clockspeed and industry maturity. Empirically, the paper provides illustrative case examples of very different supply network structures in different Japanese industries, varying from clockspeed aerospace via medium to high clockspeed electronics and telecom, which show how industry settings, and not culture, determine supply network structure and dynamics.",
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Same moon rising : On the non-existence of a unique Japanese model for supply network dynamics. / Akkermans, H.A.

In: Japan Studies Association Journal, Vol. 8, 2010, p. 101-116.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientific

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AB - The industrial organisation of Japanese industry in keiretsu-type of supply networks has long been considered a phenomenon attributable to cultural factors, as something uniquely “Japanese”. This paper challenges this view, both theoretically and empirically, Theoretically, the paper draws on the field of operations management, first by making the comparison with “lean production” and secondly by providing alternative explanations for the specific structure of Japanese supply networks such as modularity of product architecture, industry clockspeed and industry maturity. Empirically, the paper provides illustrative case examples of very different supply network structures in different Japanese industries, varying from clockspeed aerospace via medium to high clockspeed electronics and telecom, which show how industry settings, and not culture, determine supply network structure and dynamics.

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