Satisfaction with information provision in cancer patients and the moderating effect of Type D personality

O. Husson, J. Denollet, S. Oerlemans, F. Mols

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Objective
Optimal information provision is important in cancer survivorship, but satisfaction with this provision may depend upon individual differences in personality. We examined the effect of the personality traits negative affectivity and social inhibition, and their combined effect (Type D personality) on satisfaction with received information.
Methods
Four population‐based, cross‐sectional surveys were conducted. All individuals diagnosed with lymphoma, multiple myeloma, endometrial cancer or colorectal cancer (1998–2008) as registered in the Eindhoven Cancer Registry were eligible for participation. In total, 4446 patients received questionnaires including the EORTC QLQ‐INFO25 and the Type D personality scale (DS14); 69% responded (n = 3080).
Results
Nineteen percent of patients (n = 572) had a Type D personality. The perceived receipt of disease‐specific (mean 46 vs. 51), medical test (56 vs. 63) and treatment information (37 vs. 42) was significantly lower for Type D patients compared with non‐Type Ds as assessed with the EORTC QLQ‐INFO25 (scales 0–100; all ps < 0.01). Cancer patients with a Type D personality were less satisfied with the received information (49 vs. 58; p < 0.01) and found the received information less useful (55 vs. 61; p < 0.01) compared with non‐Type Ds. Multivariate linear regression analyses showed that Type D personality was independently associated with information about the disease (Beta = −0.09), medical tests (Beta = −0.12) and treatment (Beta = −0.08), and with satisfaction with information received (OR = 0.54; 95%CI = 0.44–0.66;all ps < 0.01).
Conclusions
This study showed that patients with a Type D personality perceived that they received less information and reported less satisfaction with the amount of received information as compared with non‐Type D patients.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2124-2132
JournalPsycho-Oncology
Volume22
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Neoplasms
Endometrial Neoplasms
Individuality
Linear Models
Lymphoma
Survival Rate
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

@article{4a0ec1e203014f02a912e87becb5acbf,
title = "Satisfaction with information provision in cancer patients and the moderating effect of Type D personality",
abstract = "ObjectiveOptimal information provision is important in cancer survivorship, but satisfaction with this provision may depend upon individual differences in personality. We examined the effect of the personality traits negative affectivity and social inhibition, and their combined effect (Type D personality) on satisfaction with received information.MethodsFour population‐based, cross‐sectional surveys were conducted. All individuals diagnosed with lymphoma, multiple myeloma, endometrial cancer or colorectal cancer (1998–2008) as registered in the Eindhoven Cancer Registry were eligible for participation. In total, 4446 patients received questionnaires including the EORTC QLQ‐INFO25 and the Type D personality scale (DS14); 69{\%} responded (n = 3080).ResultsNineteen percent of patients (n = 572) had a Type D personality. The perceived receipt of disease‐specific (mean 46 vs. 51), medical test (56 vs. 63) and treatment information (37 vs. 42) was significantly lower for Type D patients compared with non‐Type Ds as assessed with the EORTC QLQ‐INFO25 (scales 0–100; all ps < 0.01). Cancer patients with a Type D personality were less satisfied with the received information (49 vs. 58; p < 0.01) and found the received information less useful (55 vs. 61; p < 0.01) compared with non‐Type Ds. Multivariate linear regression analyses showed that Type D personality was independently associated with information about the disease (Beta = −0.09), medical tests (Beta = −0.12) and treatment (Beta = −0.08), and with satisfaction with information received (OR = 0.54; 95{\%}CI = 0.44–0.66;all ps < 0.01).ConclusionsThis study showed that patients with a Type D personality perceived that they received less information and reported less satisfaction with the amount of received information as compared with non‐Type D patients.",
author = "O. Husson and J. Denollet and S. Oerlemans and F. Mols",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1002/pon.3267",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "2124--2132",
journal = "Psycho-Oncology",
issn = "1057-9249",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "9",

}

Satisfaction with information provision in cancer patients and the moderating effect of Type D personality. / Husson, O.; Denollet, J.; Oerlemans, S.; Mols, F.

In: Psycho-Oncology, Vol. 22, No. 9, 2013, p. 2124-2132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Satisfaction with information provision in cancer patients and the moderating effect of Type D personality

AU - Husson, O.

AU - Denollet, J.

AU - Oerlemans, S.

AU - Mols, F.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - ObjectiveOptimal information provision is important in cancer survivorship, but satisfaction with this provision may depend upon individual differences in personality. We examined the effect of the personality traits negative affectivity and social inhibition, and their combined effect (Type D personality) on satisfaction with received information.MethodsFour population‐based, cross‐sectional surveys were conducted. All individuals diagnosed with lymphoma, multiple myeloma, endometrial cancer or colorectal cancer (1998–2008) as registered in the Eindhoven Cancer Registry were eligible for participation. In total, 4446 patients received questionnaires including the EORTC QLQ‐INFO25 and the Type D personality scale (DS14); 69% responded (n = 3080).ResultsNineteen percent of patients (n = 572) had a Type D personality. The perceived receipt of disease‐specific (mean 46 vs. 51), medical test (56 vs. 63) and treatment information (37 vs. 42) was significantly lower for Type D patients compared with non‐Type Ds as assessed with the EORTC QLQ‐INFO25 (scales 0–100; all ps < 0.01). Cancer patients with a Type D personality were less satisfied with the received information (49 vs. 58; p < 0.01) and found the received information less useful (55 vs. 61; p < 0.01) compared with non‐Type Ds. Multivariate linear regression analyses showed that Type D personality was independently associated with information about the disease (Beta = −0.09), medical tests (Beta = −0.12) and treatment (Beta = −0.08), and with satisfaction with information received (OR = 0.54; 95%CI = 0.44–0.66;all ps < 0.01).ConclusionsThis study showed that patients with a Type D personality perceived that they received less information and reported less satisfaction with the amount of received information as compared with non‐Type D patients.

AB - ObjectiveOptimal information provision is important in cancer survivorship, but satisfaction with this provision may depend upon individual differences in personality. We examined the effect of the personality traits negative affectivity and social inhibition, and their combined effect (Type D personality) on satisfaction with received information.MethodsFour population‐based, cross‐sectional surveys were conducted. All individuals diagnosed with lymphoma, multiple myeloma, endometrial cancer or colorectal cancer (1998–2008) as registered in the Eindhoven Cancer Registry were eligible for participation. In total, 4446 patients received questionnaires including the EORTC QLQ‐INFO25 and the Type D personality scale (DS14); 69% responded (n = 3080).ResultsNineteen percent of patients (n = 572) had a Type D personality. The perceived receipt of disease‐specific (mean 46 vs. 51), medical test (56 vs. 63) and treatment information (37 vs. 42) was significantly lower for Type D patients compared with non‐Type Ds as assessed with the EORTC QLQ‐INFO25 (scales 0–100; all ps < 0.01). Cancer patients with a Type D personality were less satisfied with the received information (49 vs. 58; p < 0.01) and found the received information less useful (55 vs. 61; p < 0.01) compared with non‐Type Ds. Multivariate linear regression analyses showed that Type D personality was independently associated with information about the disease (Beta = −0.09), medical tests (Beta = −0.12) and treatment (Beta = −0.08), and with satisfaction with information received (OR = 0.54; 95%CI = 0.44–0.66;all ps < 0.01).ConclusionsThis study showed that patients with a Type D personality perceived that they received less information and reported less satisfaction with the amount of received information as compared with non‐Type D patients.

U2 - 10.1002/pon.3267

DO - 10.1002/pon.3267

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 2124

EP - 2132

JO - Psycho-Oncology

JF - Psycho-Oncology

SN - 1057-9249

IS - 9

ER -