Screening for and subsequent participation in a trial for depression and anxiety in people with type 2 diabetes treated in primary care

Who do we reach?

C.H. Stoop, G.M. Nefs, V.J.M. Pop, François Pouwer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Aims:

This study investigated (factors related to) (a) the response to a screening procedure for depression and anxiety in people with type 2 diabetes in primary care, and (b) participation in a subsequent randomised controlled trial targeting depressive or anxiety symptoms.

Methods:

People with type 2 diabetes (n=1837) received a screening questionnaire assessing depressive symptoms (PHQ-9) and anxiety symptoms (GAD-7). Eligible persons who scored above the cut-off score (PHQ-9≥7 or GAD-7≥8) were offered to participate in the trial.

Results:

In total, 798 people (43%) returned the screening questionnaire. Non-responders were more often female (53% vs 44%, p<0.001), had higher LDL cholesterol levels (Cohen's d=0.17, p=0.001) and a higher albumin/creatinine ratio (Cohen's d=0.08, p=0.01). In total, 130 people (18%) reported elevated depressive or anxiety symptoms. Twenty-seven persons agreed to participate in the trial. Factors related to participation were a high education level, a higher level of diabetes distress and a history of psychological problems.

Conclusions:

Using screening as recruitment resulted in a small number of participants in a treatment trial for anxiety and depression. Research is needed to investigate whether screening is also followed by a low uptake of treatment in primary care outside a RCT setting.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)273–280
JournalPrimary Care Diabetes
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Depression
Hypercholesterolemia
LDL Cholesterol
Creatinine
Education
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Journal Article

Cite this

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title = "Screening for and subsequent participation in a trial for depression and anxiety in people with type 2 diabetes treated in primary care: Who do we reach?",
abstract = "Aims: This study investigated (factors related to) (a) the response to a screening procedure for depression and anxiety in people with type 2 diabetes in primary care, and (b) participation in a subsequent randomised controlled trial targeting depressive or anxiety symptoms.Methods: People with type 2 diabetes (n=1837) received a screening questionnaire assessing depressive symptoms (PHQ-9) and anxiety symptoms (GAD-7). Eligible persons who scored above the cut-off score (PHQ-9≥7 or GAD-7≥8) were offered to participate in the trial.Results: In total, 798 people (43{\%}) returned the screening questionnaire. Non-responders were more often female (53{\%} vs 44{\%}, p<0.001), had higher LDL cholesterol levels (Cohen's d=0.17, p=0.001) and a higher albumin/creatinine ratio (Cohen's d=0.08, p=0.01). In total, 130 people (18{\%}) reported elevated depressive or anxiety symptoms. Twenty-seven persons agreed to participate in the trial. Factors related to participation were a high education level, a higher level of diabetes distress and a history of psychological problems.Conclusions: Using screening as recruitment resulted in a small number of participants in a treatment trial for anxiety and depression. Research is needed to investigate whether screening is also followed by a low uptake of treatment in primary care outside a RCT setting.",
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Screening for and subsequent participation in a trial for depression and anxiety in people with type 2 diabetes treated in primary care : Who do we reach? / Stoop, C.H.; Nefs, G.M.; Pop, V.J.M.; Pouwer, François.

In: Primary Care Diabetes, Vol. 11, No. 3, 2017, p. 273–280.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Screening for and subsequent participation in a trial for depression and anxiety in people with type 2 diabetes treated in primary care

T2 - Who do we reach?

AU - Stoop, C.H.

AU - Nefs, G.M.

AU - Pop, V.J.M.

AU - Pouwer, François

N1 - Copyright © 2017 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Aims: This study investigated (factors related to) (a) the response to a screening procedure for depression and anxiety in people with type 2 diabetes in primary care, and (b) participation in a subsequent randomised controlled trial targeting depressive or anxiety symptoms.Methods: People with type 2 diabetes (n=1837) received a screening questionnaire assessing depressive symptoms (PHQ-9) and anxiety symptoms (GAD-7). Eligible persons who scored above the cut-off score (PHQ-9≥7 or GAD-7≥8) were offered to participate in the trial.Results: In total, 798 people (43%) returned the screening questionnaire. Non-responders were more often female (53% vs 44%, p<0.001), had higher LDL cholesterol levels (Cohen's d=0.17, p=0.001) and a higher albumin/creatinine ratio (Cohen's d=0.08, p=0.01). In total, 130 people (18%) reported elevated depressive or anxiety symptoms. Twenty-seven persons agreed to participate in the trial. Factors related to participation were a high education level, a higher level of diabetes distress and a history of psychological problems.Conclusions: Using screening as recruitment resulted in a small number of participants in a treatment trial for anxiety and depression. Research is needed to investigate whether screening is also followed by a low uptake of treatment in primary care outside a RCT setting.

AB - Aims: This study investigated (factors related to) (a) the response to a screening procedure for depression and anxiety in people with type 2 diabetes in primary care, and (b) participation in a subsequent randomised controlled trial targeting depressive or anxiety symptoms.Methods: People with type 2 diabetes (n=1837) received a screening questionnaire assessing depressive symptoms (PHQ-9) and anxiety symptoms (GAD-7). Eligible persons who scored above the cut-off score (PHQ-9≥7 or GAD-7≥8) were offered to participate in the trial.Results: In total, 798 people (43%) returned the screening questionnaire. Non-responders were more often female (53% vs 44%, p<0.001), had higher LDL cholesterol levels (Cohen's d=0.17, p=0.001) and a higher albumin/creatinine ratio (Cohen's d=0.08, p=0.01). In total, 130 people (18%) reported elevated depressive or anxiety symptoms. Twenty-seven persons agreed to participate in the trial. Factors related to participation were a high education level, a higher level of diabetes distress and a history of psychological problems.Conclusions: Using screening as recruitment resulted in a small number of participants in a treatment trial for anxiety and depression. Research is needed to investigate whether screening is also followed by a low uptake of treatment in primary care outside a RCT setting.

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