Self-concept clarity in adolescents and parents: A six-wave longitudinal and multi-Informant study on development and intergenerational transmission.

E Crocetti, M Rubini, S Branje , H Koot , W.H.J. Meeus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to disentangle patterns of change and stability in self-concept clarity (SCC) in adolescents and in their parents and (b) to examine processes of intergenerational transmission of SCC in families with adolescents.
Participants were 497 Dutch families including the father (baseline Mage = 46.74), the mother (baseline Mage = 44.41), and their adolescent child (56.9% males; baseline Mage = 13.03). Each family member completed the SCC scale for six waves, with a one-year interval between each wave.
Latent growth curve analyses indicated that adolescent boys reported higher SCC than girls. Furthermore, fathers and mothers reported higher SCC than their children, and it increased over time. Indices of SCC rank-order stability were high and increased from T1 to T2, T2 to T3, etc., for each family member, especially for adolescents. Multivariate latent growth curve analyses and cross-lagged models highlighted a unidirectional transmission process, with fathers’ and mothers’ SCC influencing adolescents’ SCC. This result was not moderated by adolescent gender. These findings indicate that self-concept clarity is transmitted from parents to children.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)580–593
JournalJournal of Personality
Volume84
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Parents
Fathers
Mothers

Cite this

@article{f17a9347e9bf4f62932d9ccb8edc21aa,
title = "Self-concept clarity in adolescents and parents: A six-wave longitudinal and multi-Informant study on development and intergenerational transmission.",
abstract = "The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to disentangle patterns of change and stability in self-concept clarity (SCC) in adolescents and in their parents and (b) to examine processes of intergenerational transmission of SCC in families with adolescents.Participants were 497 Dutch families including the father (baseline Mage = 46.74), the mother (baseline Mage = 44.41), and their adolescent child (56.9{\%} males; baseline Mage = 13.03). Each family member completed the SCC scale for six waves, with a one-year interval between each wave.Latent growth curve analyses indicated that adolescent boys reported higher SCC than girls. Furthermore, fathers and mothers reported higher SCC than their children, and it increased over time. Indices of SCC rank-order stability were high and increased from T1 to T2, T2 to T3, etc., for each family member, especially for adolescents. Multivariate latent growth curve analyses and cross-lagged models highlighted a unidirectional transmission process, with fathers’ and mothers’ SCC influencing adolescents’ SCC. This result was not moderated by adolescent gender. These findings indicate that self-concept clarity is transmitted from parents to children.",
author = "E Crocetti and M Rubini and S Branje and H Koot and W.H.J. Meeus",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1111/jopy.12181",
language = "English",
volume = "84",
pages = "580–593",
journal = "Journal of Personality",
issn = "0022-3506",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "5",

}

Self-concept clarity in adolescents and parents: A six-wave longitudinal and multi-Informant study on development and intergenerational transmission. / Crocetti, E; Rubini, M; Branje , S; Koot , H; Meeus, W.H.J.

In: Journal of Personality, Vol. 84, No. 5, 2016, p. 580–593.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Self-concept clarity in adolescents and parents: A six-wave longitudinal and multi-Informant study on development and intergenerational transmission.

AU - Crocetti, E

AU - Rubini, M

AU - Branje , S

AU - Koot , H

AU - Meeus, W.H.J.

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to disentangle patterns of change and stability in self-concept clarity (SCC) in adolescents and in their parents and (b) to examine processes of intergenerational transmission of SCC in families with adolescents.Participants were 497 Dutch families including the father (baseline Mage = 46.74), the mother (baseline Mage = 44.41), and their adolescent child (56.9% males; baseline Mage = 13.03). Each family member completed the SCC scale for six waves, with a one-year interval between each wave.Latent growth curve analyses indicated that adolescent boys reported higher SCC than girls. Furthermore, fathers and mothers reported higher SCC than their children, and it increased over time. Indices of SCC rank-order stability were high and increased from T1 to T2, T2 to T3, etc., for each family member, especially for adolescents. Multivariate latent growth curve analyses and cross-lagged models highlighted a unidirectional transmission process, with fathers’ and mothers’ SCC influencing adolescents’ SCC. This result was not moderated by adolescent gender. These findings indicate that self-concept clarity is transmitted from parents to children.

AB - The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to disentangle patterns of change and stability in self-concept clarity (SCC) in adolescents and in their parents and (b) to examine processes of intergenerational transmission of SCC in families with adolescents.Participants were 497 Dutch families including the father (baseline Mage = 46.74), the mother (baseline Mage = 44.41), and their adolescent child (56.9% males; baseline Mage = 13.03). Each family member completed the SCC scale for six waves, with a one-year interval between each wave.Latent growth curve analyses indicated that adolescent boys reported higher SCC than girls. Furthermore, fathers and mothers reported higher SCC than their children, and it increased over time. Indices of SCC rank-order stability were high and increased from T1 to T2, T2 to T3, etc., for each family member, especially for adolescents. Multivariate latent growth curve analyses and cross-lagged models highlighted a unidirectional transmission process, with fathers’ and mothers’ SCC influencing adolescents’ SCC. This result was not moderated by adolescent gender. These findings indicate that self-concept clarity is transmitted from parents to children.

U2 - 10.1111/jopy.12181

DO - 10.1111/jopy.12181

M3 - Article

VL - 84

SP - 580

EP - 593

JO - Journal of Personality

JF - Journal of Personality

SN - 0022-3506

IS - 5

ER -