Self-monitoring of health data by patients with a chronic disease

Does disease controllability matter?

M. W. J. Huygens, I.C.S. Swinkels, J.D. de Jong, M.J.W.M. Heijmans, R.D. Friele, O.C.P. van Schayck, L.P. Witte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

11 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background:
There is a growing emphasis on self-monitoring applications that allow patients to measure their own physical health parameters. A prerequisite for achieving positive effects is patients’ willingness to self-monitor. The
controllability of disease types, patients’ perceived self-efficacy and health problems could play an essential role in this. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between patients’ willingness to self-monitor and a range of disease and patient specific variables including controllability of disease type, patients’ perceived self-efficacy and health problems.
Methods:
Data regarding 627 participants with 17 chronic somatic disease types from a Dutch panel of people with chronic diseases have been used for this cross-sectional study. Perceived self-efficacy was assessed using the general self-efficacy scale, perceived health problems using the Physical Health Composite Score (PCS). Participants indicated their willingness to self-monitor. An expert panel assessed for 17 chronic disease types the extent to which patients can independently keep their disease in control. Logistic regression analyses were conducted.
Results:
Patients’ willingness to self-monitor differs greatly among disease types: patients with diabetes (71.0%), asthma (59.6%) and hypertension (59.1%) were most willing to self-monitor. In contrast, patients with rheumatism (40.0%),
migraine (41.2%) and other neurological disorders (42.9%) were less willing to self-monitor. It seems that there might be a relationship between disease controllability scores and patients’ willingness to self-monitor. No evidence is found of a relationship between general self-efficacy and PCS scores, and patients’ willingness to self-monitor.
Conclusions:
This study provides the first evidence that patients’ willingness to self-monitor might be associated with disease controllability. Further research should investigate this association more deeply and should focus on how disease controllability influences willingness to self-monitor. In addition, since willingness to self-monitor differed greatly among patient groups, it should be taken into account that not all patient groups are willing to self-monitor.
Original languageEnglish
Article number40
JournalBMC Family Practice
Volume18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Nervous System Diseases
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models

Cite this

Huygens, M. W. J., Swinkels, I. C. S., de Jong, J. D., Heijmans, M. J. W. M., Friele, R. D., van Schayck, O. C. P., & Witte, L. P. (2017). Self-monitoring of health data by patients with a chronic disease: Does disease controllability matter? . BMC Family Practice, 18, [40]. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12875-017-0615-3
Huygens, M. W. J. ; Swinkels, I.C.S. ; de Jong, J.D. ; Heijmans, M.J.W.M. ; Friele, R.D. ; van Schayck, O.C.P. ; Witte, L.P. / Self-monitoring of health data by patients with a chronic disease : Does disease controllability matter? . In: BMC Family Practice. 2017 ; Vol. 18.
@article{b912f5aeb8a84364ad764e88ea14d2a6,
title = "Self-monitoring of health data by patients with a chronic disease: Does disease controllability matter?",
abstract = "Background: There is a growing emphasis on self-monitoring applications that allow patients to measure their own physical health parameters. A prerequisite for achieving positive effects is patients’ willingness to self-monitor. Thecontrollability of disease types, patients’ perceived self-efficacy and health problems could play an essential role in this. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between patients’ willingness to self-monitor and a range of disease and patient specific variables including controllability of disease type, patients’ perceived self-efficacy and health problems.Methods: Data regarding 627 participants with 17 chronic somatic disease types from a Dutch panel of people with chronic diseases have been used for this cross-sectional study. Perceived self-efficacy was assessed using the general self-efficacy scale, perceived health problems using the Physical Health Composite Score (PCS). Participants indicated their willingness to self-monitor. An expert panel assessed for 17 chronic disease types the extent to which patients can independently keep their disease in control. Logistic regression analyses were conducted.Results: Patients’ willingness to self-monitor differs greatly among disease types: patients with diabetes (71.0{\%}), asthma (59.6{\%}) and hypertension (59.1{\%}) were most willing to self-monitor. In contrast, patients with rheumatism (40.0{\%}),migraine (41.2{\%}) and other neurological disorders (42.9{\%}) were less willing to self-monitor. It seems that there might be a relationship between disease controllability scores and patients’ willingness to self-monitor. No evidence is found of a relationship between general self-efficacy and PCS scores, and patients’ willingness to self-monitor.Conclusions: This study provides the first evidence that patients’ willingness to self-monitor might be associated with disease controllability. Further research should investigate this association more deeply and should focus on how disease controllability influences willingness to self-monitor. In addition, since willingness to self-monitor differed greatly among patient groups, it should be taken into account that not all patient groups are willing to self-monitor.",
author = "Huygens, {M. W. J.} and I.C.S. Swinkels and {de Jong}, J.D. and M.J.W.M. Heijmans and R.D. Friele and {van Schayck}, O.C.P. and L.P. Witte",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1186/s12875-017-0615-3",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
journal = "BMC Family Practice",
issn = "1471-2296",
publisher = "BioMed Central",

}

Self-monitoring of health data by patients with a chronic disease : Does disease controllability matter? . / Huygens, M. W. J.; Swinkels, I.C.S.; de Jong, J.D.; Heijmans, M.J.W.M.; Friele, R.D.; van Schayck, O.C.P.; Witte, L.P.

In: BMC Family Practice, Vol. 18, 40, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Self-monitoring of health data by patients with a chronic disease

T2 - Does disease controllability matter?

AU - Huygens, M. W. J.

AU - Swinkels, I.C.S.

AU - de Jong, J.D.

AU - Heijmans, M.J.W.M.

AU - Friele, R.D.

AU - van Schayck, O.C.P.

AU - Witte, L.P.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Background: There is a growing emphasis on self-monitoring applications that allow patients to measure their own physical health parameters. A prerequisite for achieving positive effects is patients’ willingness to self-monitor. Thecontrollability of disease types, patients’ perceived self-efficacy and health problems could play an essential role in this. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between patients’ willingness to self-monitor and a range of disease and patient specific variables including controllability of disease type, patients’ perceived self-efficacy and health problems.Methods: Data regarding 627 participants with 17 chronic somatic disease types from a Dutch panel of people with chronic diseases have been used for this cross-sectional study. Perceived self-efficacy was assessed using the general self-efficacy scale, perceived health problems using the Physical Health Composite Score (PCS). Participants indicated their willingness to self-monitor. An expert panel assessed for 17 chronic disease types the extent to which patients can independently keep their disease in control. Logistic regression analyses were conducted.Results: Patients’ willingness to self-monitor differs greatly among disease types: patients with diabetes (71.0%), asthma (59.6%) and hypertension (59.1%) were most willing to self-monitor. In contrast, patients with rheumatism (40.0%),migraine (41.2%) and other neurological disorders (42.9%) were less willing to self-monitor. It seems that there might be a relationship between disease controllability scores and patients’ willingness to self-monitor. No evidence is found of a relationship between general self-efficacy and PCS scores, and patients’ willingness to self-monitor.Conclusions: This study provides the first evidence that patients’ willingness to self-monitor might be associated with disease controllability. Further research should investigate this association more deeply and should focus on how disease controllability influences willingness to self-monitor. In addition, since willingness to self-monitor differed greatly among patient groups, it should be taken into account that not all patient groups are willing to self-monitor.

AB - Background: There is a growing emphasis on self-monitoring applications that allow patients to measure their own physical health parameters. A prerequisite for achieving positive effects is patients’ willingness to self-monitor. Thecontrollability of disease types, patients’ perceived self-efficacy and health problems could play an essential role in this. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between patients’ willingness to self-monitor and a range of disease and patient specific variables including controllability of disease type, patients’ perceived self-efficacy and health problems.Methods: Data regarding 627 participants with 17 chronic somatic disease types from a Dutch panel of people with chronic diseases have been used for this cross-sectional study. Perceived self-efficacy was assessed using the general self-efficacy scale, perceived health problems using the Physical Health Composite Score (PCS). Participants indicated their willingness to self-monitor. An expert panel assessed for 17 chronic disease types the extent to which patients can independently keep their disease in control. Logistic regression analyses were conducted.Results: Patients’ willingness to self-monitor differs greatly among disease types: patients with diabetes (71.0%), asthma (59.6%) and hypertension (59.1%) were most willing to self-monitor. In contrast, patients with rheumatism (40.0%),migraine (41.2%) and other neurological disorders (42.9%) were less willing to self-monitor. It seems that there might be a relationship between disease controllability scores and patients’ willingness to self-monitor. No evidence is found of a relationship between general self-efficacy and PCS scores, and patients’ willingness to self-monitor.Conclusions: This study provides the first evidence that patients’ willingness to self-monitor might be associated with disease controllability. Further research should investigate this association more deeply and should focus on how disease controllability influences willingness to self-monitor. In addition, since willingness to self-monitor differed greatly among patient groups, it should be taken into account that not all patient groups are willing to self-monitor.

U2 - 10.1186/s12875-017-0615-3

DO - 10.1186/s12875-017-0615-3

M3 - Article

VL - 18

JO - BMC Family Practice

JF - BMC Family Practice

SN - 1471-2296

M1 - 40

ER -