Self-reported access to and quality of healthcare for diabetes: Do the severely obese experience equal access?

J.B. Dixon, J.L. Browne, T. Rice, K. Jones, F. Pouwer, J. Speight

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: 
Given reported pejorative views that health professionals have about patients who are severely obese, we examined the self-reported views of the quality and availability of diabetes care from the perspective of adults with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), stratified by body mass index (BMI). 
Methods: 
1795 respondents to the Diabetes MILES - Australia national survey had T2DM. Of these, 530 (30%) were severely obese (BMI ≥35 kg/m2) and these participants were matched with 530 controls (BMI <35 kg/m2). Data regarding participants' self-reported interactions with health practitioners and services were compared. 
Results: 
Over 70% of participants reported that their general practitioner was the professional they relied on most for diabetes care. There were no betweengroup differences in patient-reported availability of health services, quality of interaction with health practitioners, resources and support for selfmanagement, or access to almost all diabetes services. 
Discussion: 
Participants who were severely obese did not generally report greater difficulty in accessing diabetes care.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)522-526
JournalAustralian Family Physician
Volume43
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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