Self-reported maternal expectations and child-rearing practices

Disentangling the associations with ethnicity, immigration, and educational background

E.S. Durgel, F.J.R. van de Vijver, B. Yagmurlu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

This study aimed at: (1) disentangling the associations between ethnicity, immigration, educational background, and mothers’ developmental expectations and (self-reported) child-rearing practices; and (2) identifying the cross-cultural differences and similarities in developmental expectations and child-rearing practices. Participants were 111 Dutch and 111 Turkish immigrant mothers in the Netherlands, and 242 Turkish mothers living in Turkey. Dutch and higher-educated mothers had a tendency to believe that children learn certain skills and behaviors at an earlier age than did Turkish and lower-educated mothers, respectively. Turkish mothers, majority group, and higher-educated mothers reported more child-centered parenting practices than Dutch mothers, immigrants, and mothers with less education, respectively. Parent-centered parenting practices were reported mainly by less educated mothers. The analyses on disentangling the associations between sociodemographic background variables and parenting pointed to the relative importance and consistency of maternal education as a predictor of parenting, compared to ethnic background and immigration history. It is concluded that disentangling variables that are often associated with studies comparing immigrant and majority groups is essential for a proper understanding of similarities and differences in developmental expectations and child-rearing practices.
Keywords: culture, developmental expectations, disentangling, Dutch, parenting practices, Turkish
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-43
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Development
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Emigration and Immigration
immigration
ethnicity
Mothers
Parenting
immigrant
Education
cultural difference
Turkey
Netherlands
education
parents
Group

Cite this

@article{a8b3a0d651ea47d78a339f79c5287897,
title = "Self-reported maternal expectations and child-rearing practices: Disentangling the associations with ethnicity, immigration, and educational background",
abstract = "This study aimed at: (1) disentangling the associations between ethnicity, immigration, educational background, and mothers’ developmental expectations and (self-reported) child-rearing practices; and (2) identifying the cross-cultural differences and similarities in developmental expectations and child-rearing practices. Participants were 111 Dutch and 111 Turkish immigrant mothers in the Netherlands, and 242 Turkish mothers living in Turkey. Dutch and higher-educated mothers had a tendency to believe that children learn certain skills and behaviors at an earlier age than did Turkish and lower-educated mothers, respectively. Turkish mothers, majority group, and higher-educated mothers reported more child-centered parenting practices than Dutch mothers, immigrants, and mothers with less education, respectively. Parent-centered parenting practices were reported mainly by less educated mothers. The analyses on disentangling the associations between sociodemographic background variables and parenting pointed to the relative importance and consistency of maternal education as a predictor of parenting, compared to ethnic background and immigration history. It is concluded that disentangling variables that are often associated with studies comparing immigrant and majority groups is essential for a proper understanding of similarities and differences in developmental expectations and child-rearing practices.Keywords: culture, developmental expectations, disentangling, Dutch, parenting practices, Turkish",
author = "E.S. Durgel and {van de Vijver}, F.J.R. and B. Yagmurlu",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1177/0165025412456145",
language = "English",
volume = "37",
pages = "35--43",
journal = "International Journal of Behavioral Development",
issn = "0165-0254",
publisher = "Sage Publications Ltd",
number = "1",

}

Self-reported maternal expectations and child-rearing practices : Disentangling the associations with ethnicity, immigration, and educational background. / Durgel, E.S.; van de Vijver, F.J.R.; Yagmurlu, B.

In: International Journal of Behavioral Development, Vol. 37, No. 1, 2013, p. 35-43.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Self-reported maternal expectations and child-rearing practices

T2 - Disentangling the associations with ethnicity, immigration, and educational background

AU - Durgel, E.S.

AU - van de Vijver, F.J.R.

AU - Yagmurlu, B.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - This study aimed at: (1) disentangling the associations between ethnicity, immigration, educational background, and mothers’ developmental expectations and (self-reported) child-rearing practices; and (2) identifying the cross-cultural differences and similarities in developmental expectations and child-rearing practices. Participants were 111 Dutch and 111 Turkish immigrant mothers in the Netherlands, and 242 Turkish mothers living in Turkey. Dutch and higher-educated mothers had a tendency to believe that children learn certain skills and behaviors at an earlier age than did Turkish and lower-educated mothers, respectively. Turkish mothers, majority group, and higher-educated mothers reported more child-centered parenting practices than Dutch mothers, immigrants, and mothers with less education, respectively. Parent-centered parenting practices were reported mainly by less educated mothers. The analyses on disentangling the associations between sociodemographic background variables and parenting pointed to the relative importance and consistency of maternal education as a predictor of parenting, compared to ethnic background and immigration history. It is concluded that disentangling variables that are often associated with studies comparing immigrant and majority groups is essential for a proper understanding of similarities and differences in developmental expectations and child-rearing practices.Keywords: culture, developmental expectations, disentangling, Dutch, parenting practices, Turkish

AB - This study aimed at: (1) disentangling the associations between ethnicity, immigration, educational background, and mothers’ developmental expectations and (self-reported) child-rearing practices; and (2) identifying the cross-cultural differences and similarities in developmental expectations and child-rearing practices. Participants were 111 Dutch and 111 Turkish immigrant mothers in the Netherlands, and 242 Turkish mothers living in Turkey. Dutch and higher-educated mothers had a tendency to believe that children learn certain skills and behaviors at an earlier age than did Turkish and lower-educated mothers, respectively. Turkish mothers, majority group, and higher-educated mothers reported more child-centered parenting practices than Dutch mothers, immigrants, and mothers with less education, respectively. Parent-centered parenting practices were reported mainly by less educated mothers. The analyses on disentangling the associations between sociodemographic background variables and parenting pointed to the relative importance and consistency of maternal education as a predictor of parenting, compared to ethnic background and immigration history. It is concluded that disentangling variables that are often associated with studies comparing immigrant and majority groups is essential for a proper understanding of similarities and differences in developmental expectations and child-rearing practices.Keywords: culture, developmental expectations, disentangling, Dutch, parenting practices, Turkish

U2 - 10.1177/0165025412456145

DO - 10.1177/0165025412456145

M3 - Article

VL - 37

SP - 35

EP - 43

JO - International Journal of Behavioral Development

JF - International Journal of Behavioral Development

SN - 0165-0254

IS - 1

ER -