Semantic priming effects can be modulated by crosslinguistic interactions during second-language auditory word recognition

Sara Guediche*, Martijn Baart, Arthur Samuel

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

The current study investigates how second language auditory word recognition, in early and highly proficient Spanish–Basque (L1-L2) bilinguals, is influenced by crosslinguistic phonological-lexical interactions and semantic priming. Phonological overlap between a word and its translation equivalent (phonological cognate status), and semantic relatedness of a preceding prime were manipulated. Experiment 1 examined word recognition performance in noisy listening conditions that introduce a high degree of uncertainty, whereas Experiment 2 employed clear listening conditions, with low uncertainty. Under noisy listening conditions, semantic priming effects interacted with phonological cognate status: for word recognition accuracy, a related prime overcame inhibitory effects of phonological overlap between target words and their translations. These findings are consistent with models of bilingual word recognition that incorporate crosslinguistic phonological-lexical-semantic interactions. Moreover, they suggest an interplay between L2-L1 interactions and the integration of information across acoustic and semantic levels of processing in flexibly mapping the speech signal onto the spoken words, under adverse listening conditions.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBilingualism: Language and Cognition
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • cognate effects
  • lexical decision
  • lexical-semantics
  • speech in noise
  • speech perception

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