Serious gaming during multidisciplinary rehabilitation for patients with complex chronic pain or fatigue complaints: Study protocol for a controlled trial and process evaluation

M.A.P. Vugts, M.C.W. Joosen, A. Mert, A. Zedlitz, H.J.M. Vrijhoef

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction
Many individuals suffer from chronic pain or functional somatic syndromes and face boundaries for diminishing functional limitations by means of biopsychosocial interventions. Serious gaming could complement multidisciplinary interventions through enjoyment and independent accessibility. A study protocol is presented for studying whether, how, for which patients and under what circumstances, serious gaming improves patient health outcomes during regular multidisciplinary rehabilitation.
Methods and analysis
A mixed-methods design is described that prioritises a two-armed naturalistic quasi-experiment. An experimental group is composed of patients who follow serious gaming during an outpatient multidisciplinary programme at two sites of a Dutch rehabilitation centre. Control group patients follow the same programme without serious gaming in two similar sites. Multivariate mixed-modelling analysis is planned for assessing how much variance in 250 patient records of routinely monitored pain intensity, pain coping and cognition, fatigue and psychopathology outcomes is attributable to serious gaming. Embedded qualitative methods include unobtrusive collection and analyses of stakeholder focus group interviews, participant feedback and semistructured patient interviews. Process analyses are carried out by a systematic approach of mixing qualitative and quantitative methods at various stages of the research.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere016394
JournalBMJ Open
Volume7
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2017

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