Similarities and differences in implicit personality concepts across ethno-cultural groups in South Africa

V.H. Valchev, J.A. Nel, F.J.R. van de Vijver, D. Meiring, G.P. de Bruin, S.R. Rothmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Using a combined emic–etic approach, the present study investigates similarities and differences in the indigenous personality concepts of ethnocultural groups in South Africa. Semistructured interviews asking for self- and other-descriptions were conducted with 1,027 Blacks, 58 Indians, and 105 Whites, speakers of the country’s 11 official languages. A model with 9 broad personality clusters subsuming the Big Five—Conscientiousness, Emotional Stability, Extraversion, Facilitating, Integrity, Intellect, Openness, Relationship Harmony, and Soft-Heartedness (Nel et al., 2012)—was examined. The 9 clusters were found in all groups, yet the groups differed in their use of the model’s components: Blacks referred more to social-relational descriptions, specific trait manifestations, and social norms, whereas Whites referred more to personal-growth descriptions and abstract concepts, and Indians had an intermediate pattern. The results suggest that a broad spectrum of personality concepts should be included in the development of common personality models and measurement tools for diverse cultural groups.
Keywords: implicit personality concepts, emic–etic approach, indigenous personality model
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)365-388
JournalJournal of Cross-Cultural Psychology
Volume44
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Valchev, V. H., Nel, J. A., van de Vijver, F. J. R., Meiring, D., de Bruin, G. P., & Rothmann, S. R. (2013). Similarities and differences in implicit personality concepts across ethno-cultural groups in South Africa. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 44, 365-388. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022022112443856
Valchev, V.H. ; Nel, J.A. ; van de Vijver, F.J.R. ; Meiring, D. ; de Bruin, G.P. ; Rothmann, S.R. / Similarities and differences in implicit personality concepts across ethno-cultural groups in South Africa. In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 2013 ; Vol. 44. pp. 365-388.
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Similarities and differences in implicit personality concepts across ethno-cultural groups in South Africa. / Valchev, V.H.; Nel, J.A.; van de Vijver, F.J.R.; Meiring, D.; de Bruin, G.P.; Rothmann, S.R.

In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, Vol. 44, 2013, p. 365-388.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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